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  • Avatar mapplebum 
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    I prefer the Subaru to the Rav 4 or crv. Those bigger SUVs are a different class of vehicle.
    I guess I should have suggested the snow cat

    https://images.app.goo.gl/aveHmHPWzJVx16ZG6

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    Oh heck yea! Someone in my neighborhood drives a SmartCar and every winter I wonder “how?”

    in reply to: Need + Reward: Another Car Thread #222776 Reply
    Liked by Lordosis
    Avatar mapplebum 
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    As WCI notes many of these compact “suvs” are actually no higher than cars and are built on car frames. The AWD will help of course but just depends on how much volume you’re having to plow through. Bought 4wd Tacoma for said purpose though infrequent here

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    Interesting! Are they heavier? It looks like we average just over 50 inches of snow a year. I’m in an urban neighborhood / midsize city. Weekdays are fine with salt & plowing, city driving just becomes problematic when the snow has been pushed to the sides of the street it becomes packed in and icy. My car rides so low to the ground I’ve gotten stuck going 10MPH and more times than I can count can’t get out of parking spot when the ice /snow is so small I can’t even see why I’m stuck. What happened this winter was by far the exception but as @mpmd so aptly put, when you live in the great north you don’t need AWD until the moment you do. I’m pretty that comment is the reason I started taking seriously the idea that I really need to make a switch. Husband drives a Subaru Forester. It’s a fantastic car but I’m a little person. I’ve tried all the different settings and it’s just too big of a car for me to drive comfortably.

    in reply to: Need + Reward: Another Car Thread #222774 Reply
    Avatar mapplebum 
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    I’ve done a fair amount of research / navel gazing. I want to choose a car that will last a long time, and not cost an arm and a leg to maintain. My frugal side says to buy a CRV or Rav4. The newest models are pretty slick. But you know what’s slicker? Acura RDX and Lexus UX. Somewhat status vehicles. (The X1 is cool as hell and the perfect size but I’ve all but ruled out BMW and Audi for maintenance costs.) OTOH I’ve always looked forward to the moment when I could buy a car that I want.  The CRV and Rav4 are neither cool nor sexy. Do I deserve to upgrade to a luxury(ish) vehicle? $0 NW isn’t much to write home about.

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    Buy them if you like them, if you think they look good, if you like the features/options, if it makes you feel good, but not because you think they will impress anyone else.

    Generally speaking, entry-level luxury is about as non-status/anti-status as it gets.  IMO, the Acura RDX in particular just screams middle-middle class.  With luxury cars, buying the small one looks like, if anything, you cheaped out, or, worse, you couldn’t afford the bigger one.  Of course that’s ridiculous, and you may not even want a bigger car, but that’s the perception nevertheless.

    Keep in mind that as doctor’s wife, especially now as an attending, the people you are trying to impress all likely now have more money than you, or at the very least have been used to spending a lot more money than you are for awhile now.

    However I wouldn’t say that the Acura and Lexus aren’t good vehicles.  And you may be able to shop hard and buy one for a decent price compared to, e.g., a loaded Rav4.

    If you get the Rav4 with the options you want, it’ll last as long as you want it to.  Once you have the net worth to be able to easily justify the “luxury” purchase, chances are you probably won’t be that impressed by it anymore.  Personally I think a new Rav4 is more impressive than a Lexus UX or NX.

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    Well said. I’m in the middle of teaching but to be clear I’m considering a compact SUV as a concession. I really would prefer a sedan but most sedans don’t have seats that fold flat and my husband has convinced me even a small SUV will do better in the snow. I am not into big cars nor am I a big person. As I responded to MPMD, I’m right at 5ft tall. It’s not uncommon 4th and 5th graders are taller than me. When I drive my husband’s Forester I pull the seat as far forward as possible and it still doesn’t sit right. I can absolutely see where you’re coming from but I don’t think I would ever consider one bigger than these. You know, so short people joke about having to sit on phone books? That’s me.

    in reply to: Need + Reward: Another Car Thread #222682 Reply
    Liked by Craigy
    Avatar mapplebum 
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    you need reliable transportation. a gently used compact suv paid for in cash is fine.

    living in the great North as we do really affects these things. you don’t need AWD/4WD until you do and then you really need it.

    personally i think you are best off doing the Highlander for 5 years and then making the Lexus move. you really need to push a pencil through the opportunity cost of that money at such a young age.

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    Isn’t the Highlander massive? I’m 5 feet tall. When I drive my husband’s Forester I have to push the seat as far forward as possible. The height / length proximity has never felt right. The times I’ve had to drive larger vehicles my heels don’t even touch the floor.

    in reply to: Need + Reward: Another Car Thread #222658 Reply
    Avatar mapplebum 
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    At your age, you aren’t going to keep a compact SUV for 10 years.  You will want something bigger in less than 5 years – likely 3.  If you’re buying a 10-15 year car, get the toyota highlander or lexus RX.  If you want a compact SUV, get a used rav4 and trade up when you’re ready.  Don’t fool yourself into thinking a lexus UX is the car for the long term.  It’s not.

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    Do tell, why will I be wanting a bigger vehicle in a couple years?

    in reply to: Need + Reward: Another Car Thread #222657 Reply
    Avatar mapplebum 
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    This discussion has been had many times before.
    Net worth is Total assets- total liabilities. That is an accounting definition. Please note, the concept includes “fair value”, but excludes disposition costs or distress sales.
    My point is, risk management has many flavors. My suggestion is use your own definition for investment risk management.
    Clearly real estate can be an investment. A personal residence is where it gets gray. The key is personal, you are using (consuming it). Sure it impacts wealth and net worth, but what you going to do if it triples in value?

    Asset allocation typically applies investment in asset classes. Use that for managing investment risk. Investable assets.

    The primary risk management tool for your residence AND possessions (cars, household good, jewelry, art) is
    insurance, personal assets.

    If you change stock/bond allocation on your portfolio because you bought expensive furniture, house went up 25%, you paid off the mortgage, you haven’t managed your investment risk.

    Personal assets and investment assets are both technically included in net worth, inappropriate for investment asset allocation.

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    Sorry to go off topic again but I’m confused. FIREShrink says EF doesn’t count but Tim says jewelry & art do? I am way more inclined to include the EF. Does anyone know how hard it is to unload a $3k instrument? Let alone $30k? Or $50k?

     

    There was a moment many years ago when I was told if I could figure out how to pay for a $75k instrument it would appreciate to $250k within a few years. Looking back, the immediate question is “on what authority?” but at the time I had no doubt of the credibility of the person (trying to sell me the instrument). And I did love that thing. At 20 years old I was applying for a Parent Plus loan. When I was told about the inevitable appreciation of this instrument there was a moment when I thought “I can do this.” I could get the loan. I wanted it. The reason I didn’t go for it wasn’t really because of the price. I thought about an instrument appreciating to $250-300k and knew if I ever wanted a new one there was no way I’d ever be able to resell it. So I bought something cheaper. Here’s the thought experiment: what if I bought it? It’s 2019, the loan would be bundled up in my student debt, and now, oh hey I’m 6 figures into a positive net worth!

     

    It’s clear from reading the responses that how we calculate NW has to do with its purposes. If you’re looking for a baseline “The World is Ending” scenario lets paint in broad strokes but in order to determine how close or how far away from financial independence, retirement, and for me $0 NW, it’s personal. Assets + liabilities is easy enough to frame but then we begin to question “What is a liability?” I agree, a house can be a liability. Only time can tell if it is. Instruments (IMO) are too. Jewelry maybe. EF? Home down payment? Confused. Did I miss sarcasm?

    in reply to: Asset Allocation of Whole Net Worth #222498 Reply
    Avatar mapplebum 
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    I agree you’ll receive better advice if you break down spending/saving/debt. Personally, if I were you I would run the numbers, see if the 5 year term is feasible. If it is, do it.

    One thing I’ve learned from this forum that I don’t think is discussed directly is learning how to set up parameters to hold yourself accountable. You start with financial goals first, investigate different scenarios (2, 5, 7 year repayment schedules) and then commit to whatever you decide. If changing loan terms to 5 years is reasonable, do so in order to ensure you will continue acting in your highest self. Keeping the loan at 10 years I’m sure you’d be able to kick back extra payments, and maybe double up every month until it’s paid off twice as fast. But see, you can’t predict you or your wife’s future needs and desires. What if you end up having 2 more kids in the next 5 years? Suddenly your house feels cramped and then now that you see how brilliant your kiddos are you think, man, they really need to go to that private school. This kind of thing happens. If you stick to the 10 year loan term then I can’t imagine anyone who wouldn’t begin strategizing to afford these new decisions. It’s amazing the things we can rationalize. So that’s why right now if you can swing that 5 year term I would say lock it in, if for nothing else than to hold future you accountable.

     

    Good luck!

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    I have to disagree with you a little here.  A 5 year aggressive loan term like that could be dangerous.  The medical world is changing rapidly and there’s no guarantee that any of us will have the same income every year.  I would just keep the terms as is and pay extra towards the principle each month when you can.  Keep a healthy emergency fund too, since you have the kid on the way. There are lot’s of “what ifs?” that can come up over the course of 5 years.  There won’t be any sympathy from a loan company if you need to take a break from big payments for a few months here and there.

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    yea it really depends on the particulars of his finances. Good thought.

    in reply to: Student Loan Help! #221358 Reply
    Avatar mapplebum 
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    I agree you’ll receive better advice if you break down spending/saving/debt. Personally, if I were you I would run the numbers, see if the 5 year term is feasible. If it is, do it.

    One thing I’ve learned from this forum that I don’t think is discussed directly is learning how to set up parameters to hold yourself accountable. You start with financial goals first, investigate different scenarios (2, 5, 7 year repayment schedules) and then commit to whatever you decide. If changing loan terms to 5 years is reasonable, do so in order to ensure you will continue acting in your highest self. Keeping the loan at 10 years I’m sure you’d be able to kick back extra payments, and maybe double up every month until it’s paid off twice as fast. But see, you can’t predict you or your wife’s future needs and desires. What if you end up having 2 more kids in the next 5 years? Suddenly your house feels cramped and then now that you see how brilliant your kiddos are you think, man, they really need to go to that private school. This kind of thing happens. If you stick to the 10 year loan term then I can’t imagine anyone who wouldn’t begin strategizing to afford these new decisions. It’s amazing the things we can rationalize. So that’s why right now if you can swing that 5 year term I would say lock it in, if for nothing else than to hold future you accountable.

     

    Good luck!

    in reply to: Student Loan Help! #221256 Reply
    Avatar mapplebum 
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    Mildly off topic. There’s a bunch of DR offices above my grocery store. Last week I saw an old dude walking around the groc with his white coat on. Cruising the parameter like the cool guy on the block. I thought it was lame and possibly unsanitary. I mean, everyone knows they come down to grab lunch. How hard is it to hang the coat before going down? When I told the husband he said he doesn’t think he’s worn his white coat since finishing training. Anyone else retire the white coat?

    Avatar mapplebum 
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    Bow ties are probably not cheaper, but they are more sanitary. The downside is that they make you look like a dork.

    I wear dress shirts (no ties), khakis/slacks, and cloth loafers pretty much every day, including weekends. I would not wear just scrubs, even if I had the option – need more pockets for my wallet and phone.

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    I actually LOL’ed. My husband wears bowties, totally dorky until he opens his mouth and you realize he’s a feral cat.

     

    Just taking a guess here. $500 / year? All of his suits (3) are custom. Banana, JCrew, and Charles Tyrwhitt. Allen Edmonds or in winter Sunday boots.

    As an aside, not only is it much more expensive now that he’s going to CrossFit with me but for the first time in his life he weighs over 140lbs. He came home yesterday saying his custom slacks are getting too tight at the quads. I love the gains but sizing up his entire wardrobe is going to be an expensive endeavor.

    Avatar mapplebum 
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    My husband and I have had this conversation since we first met. His defense: “What do you mean I’m being a jerk I’m telling the truth! ”

    As an educator I have found the more I can encourage and put a student at ease the more quickly and thoroughly they learn. That in turn makes my job much, much easier. It doesn’t surprise me that this forum takes such a blunt tone because ^ but that doesn’t mean it’s always the most effective.

    in reply to: Forum Self Reflection #220427 Reply
    Avatar mapplebum 
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    Another vote for renting. Our example: husband took a job at hospital where he did both residency and fellowship. Coming up on one year post training and we are SO GRATEFUL we did not buy. Even though we’ve lived here since 2012 and he’s been at the hospital since 2013. We couldn’t have experienced a smaller transition from fellowship to his faculty position and yet there’s still so much uncertainty in a new job. Knowing that we’re not tied to a mortgage is a major relief. Plus, a mortgage is different but for us (with similar earning potential and less than half your student debt) incurring another 6 figures of debt just doesn’t sit right.

    I know everyone does it. It’s the assumed next step for physician families but if you can tear yourself from the idea that it’s the logical next step you might see there’s more risk than you’d expect with buying immediately.

    Avatar mapplebum 
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    I still can’t get used to this using “they” as a singular non-gendered pronoun. I must have read that sentence 5 times until I figured out what it was saying.

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    I too had difficulty comprehending it. Unless an evolution of English grammar has occurred in the past 25 years and zipped past me, I still think it is “his” or “her” as singular, and “they” is plural and means more than one person.

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    Yes, if you’d like to call it an evolution, it has zipped past you, and it depends on the speaker. A few options. If someone says “they” instead of “he” or “she” it could be a mistake. My guess is in your circles that will be the case most of the time. In mine, not so much. 2.) It could be a person reluctant to give up personal information, especially on a forum like this. “They” does not allow for you to know who is husband and who is wife. 3.) The other option is a non-binary person who prefers “they.” As in, that person does not identify as either male or female. In this case, the OP later referred to their spouse as “he” so I don’t think that’s what this was, but if you see someone frequently referring to themself or another, singular, as they, put out your alerts so that you might be tactful enough to emulate their language.

     

    so basically, the use of “themself” is now proper English. Where’s my mind blown emoji?

    in reply to: Making sense of spouse income #216076 Reply
    Avatar mapplebum 
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    8% to $280k

    in reply to: What's your Match? #213809 Reply
    Liked by SLC OB, FIREshrink
    Avatar mapplebum 
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    I’ll admit I’m a bit of a wine guy. In fact, my 401k only recently eclipsed the value of my wine collection. But it’s just a hobby and I don’t view it as an investment. I plan on enjoying it and no current plans to selling. While there is appreciation, it’s just too illiquid and no an efficient investment vehicle. I think investing in cars would be similar. You have to have a environmentally controlled place, upkeep, and if you decide you want to sell you may need a middle man. Not to mention laws governing alcohol and taxes.

    That being said there if a fund on the London exchange–though I’m forgetting the name at this time. I recall it having a very high expense ratio.

    I’ve sold wine at auction and payed 10-15% in auction fees.

     

    A couple of links for more info:

    London wine exchange:

    Home

     

    Wine forum where this was discussed and analyzed:

    https://www.wineberserkers.com/forum/viewtopic.php?f=1&t=156731&p=2637219&hilit=investing#p2634347

     

     

     

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    I aspire to your greatness. What have been your go-to’s this spring? For tasting not saving.

    in reply to: Investing in Wine #213794 Reply
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