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Would you be a living kidney donor?

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  • FunkDoc83 FunkDoc83 
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    Earnest refinancing bonus

    Mrs. FunkDoc has a friend in her early 40’s who donated a kidney to a stranger she happened to be a good match for.  Other than that, I don’t know any specifics.  Would anyone here consider being a living donor for a stranger?  How about a relative, or immediate family member?  This may sound callous but my immediate thought when she told me was “Why would she do that?”  Now this person only has one kidney left, and she herself could come down with something or become ill enough to compromise her own kidney function.  Someone in their 40’s has a lot of years left to live.  I’d love to hear other perspectives on this issue.

    #196997 Reply
    Liked by Craigy
    Avatar Peds 
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    Would anyone here consider being a living donor for a stranger?

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    no, not worth the risks to my health. i thought there was a recent study showing these people did deteriorate, lose function, and end up with a higher chance of ESRD, etc.

    How about immediate family member?

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    yes.

    other relatives, still no.

     

    #197000 Reply
    Liked by Vagabond MD, Tim
    ACPC ACPC 
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    Only my children.

    #197002 Reply
    Liked by Craigy, Tim, ENT Doc
    Avatar ZZZ 
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    For my wife or child? Absolutely.

    For a stranger? Only if it was a daisy-chain donation where my wife or kid got a kidney from a stranger that was a better match than me if I gave a kidney to a stranger for whom I was a better match.

    #197003 Reply
    ACPC ACPC 
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    Only if it was a daisy-chain donation where my wife or kid got a kidney from a stranger that was a better match than me if I gave a kidney to a stranger for whom I was a better match.

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    Agree.

    #197004 Reply
    ENT Doc ENT Doc 
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    I think there’s a difference between loss of a kidney as an adult and not being born with or in terms of risk of HTN and renal disease, better with the latter. Would do it for a family member. Friend? Depends on how good.

    #197010 Reply
    Avatar octopus85 
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    There was a recent Hidden Brain podcast on this issue, and it’s very interesting to consider the psychology of why we find “donation” morally acceptable, but “sale” not:

    https://www.npr.org/2019/02/27/698563807/for-sale-by-owner-the-psychology-of-repugnant-transactions

     

    #197012 Reply
    Liked by Craigy
    CordMcNally CordMcNally 
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    Immediate family – yes. Friends – probably 3 or 4. Any one else – nope.

    “But investing isn’t about beating others at their game. It’s about controlling yourself at your own game.”
    ― Benjamin Graham, The Intelligent Investor

    #197014 Reply
    Liked by Vagabond MD, Hank
    FunkDoc83 FunkDoc83 
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    There was a recent Hidden Brain podcast on this issue, and it’s very interesting to consider the psychology of why we find “donation” morally acceptable, but “sale” not:

    https://www.npr.org/2019/02/27/698563807/for-sale-by-owner-the-psychology-of-repugnant-transactions

     

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    Should we be able to sell our organs?  Would that increase the supply of kidneys or other organs if you were compensated for it?  Quite an ethical dilemma.

    #197024 Reply
    Avatar EMscout 
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    Probably a good reason why we have two. Like others said, immediate family for sure and perhaps a handful of friends. Otherwise, no

    #197050 Reply
    CordMcNally CordMcNally 
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    There was a recent Hidden Brain podcast on this issue, and it’s very interesting to consider the psychology of why we find “donation” morally acceptable, but “sale” not:

    https://www.npr.org/2019/02/27/698563807/for-sale-by-owner-the-psychology-of-repugnant-transactions

     

    Click to expand…

    Should we be able to sell our organs?  Would that increase the supply of kidneys or other organs if you were compensated for it?  Quite an ethical dilemma.

    Click to expand…

    I don’t see why not, honestly. I mean, your organs are yours. I suspect the dilemma will come from the consequence of there being fewer “free” organs on the market which means that it would get twisted into a “the poor can’t afford new organs like the rich”. But on the flip side, the poor might have an opportunity to make some money.

     

    All seriousness aside, I bet it wouldn’t be but a year or two before somebody sued the person they bought their kidney from for it being faulty or some other ridiculous reason. Would the sale come with a warranty?

    “But investing isn’t about beating others at their game. It’s about controlling yourself at your own game.”
    ― Benjamin Graham, The Intelligent Investor

    #197051 Reply
    Liked by Craigy, ENT Doc
    FunkDoc83 FunkDoc83 
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    There was a recent Hidden Brain podcast on this issue, and it’s very interesting to consider the psychology of why we find “donation” morally acceptable, but “sale” not:

    https://www.npr.org/2019/02/27/698563807/for-sale-by-owner-the-psychology-of-repugnant-transactions

     

    Click to expand…

    Should we be able to sell our organs?  Would that increase the supply of kidneys or other organs if you were compensated for it?  Quite an ethical dilemma.

    Click to expand…

    I don’t see why not, honestly. I mean, your organs are yours. I suspect the dilemma will come from the consequence of there being fewer “free” organs on the market which means that it would get twisted into a “the poor can’t afford new organs like the rich”. But on the flip side, the poor might have an opportunity to make some money.

     

    All seriousness aside, I bet it wouldn’t be but a year or two before somebody sued the person they bought their kidney from for it being faulty or some other ridiculous reason. Would the sale come with a warranty?

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    Cord, take the poor out of it by letting them get uncle sam to pay for it.  How does this not improve the quality of life for the recipients by upping the chances of finding a match?  You are probably right about the suing thing.

    #197052 Reply
    Hank Hank 
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    Uncle Sam doesn’t pay for anything: taxpayers do.

    #197208 Reply
    Liked by Craigy, ENT Doc
    Zaphod Zaphod 
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    Nope.

    Selling while it makes sense would come with lots of issues. Obviously the poor would be giving organs to the rich and there would be endless debate issues, etc…Even if they got theirs by govt, it would still be inequal as it always would be. There will also always be some degree of predation on the poor in any kind of situation like that, so it would have to be set up to where the donor class was appropriately compensated.

    Likely there would be so many costs and legal issues to come from it that it would be nearly impossible to start.

    #197253 Reply
    Avatar G 
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    Nope.

    Selling while it makes sense would come with lots of issues. Obviously the poor would be giving organs to the rich and there would be endless debate issues, etc…Even if they got theirs by govt, it would still be inequal as it always would be. There will also always be some degree of predation on the poor in any kind of situation like that, so it would have to be set up to where the donor class was appropriately compensated.

    Likely there would be so many costs and legal issues to come from it that it would be nearly impossible to start.

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    I remember discussing this decades ago in econ class.  Very interesting stuff to think about, free market capitalists would argue that the supply/demand curve would make everything work.  Of course, since that econ class, I’ve accumulated enough gray hair to be extremely skeptic when an academic links together the words “free” “market” and “capitalist”….

    For me, outside of my family, my health is my most important asset–there is literally no amount of money that I would take to jeopardize it.  Plus I’m a huge wimp.  So, in answer to the OP, I’d give up a kidney only for household family.  (Luckily, no one will ask me to donate for my dog, so that narrows the list even more.)

    #197266 Reply
    Liked by Zaphod

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