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What do football players and doctors have in common?

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  • Avatar Tim 
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    @mpmd,
    “ Every so often I’ll see a CNN clip of some brawl in an MLB game and think, “explain to me why those people aren’t being arrested and charged w/ assault?”

    There are required actions in our society, “unwritten rules”. For example, when are handshakes appropriate?
    To your question, appropriate physical contact is a very situational etiquette. Baseball has its own rules too, some written and some not. Different cultures have the same, again it’s situational. Below are a few of the “unwritten rules” of MLB for your review.

    The Top 15 Unwritten Rules of Baseball

    The rules are to be enforced ON THE FIELD. Off the field is a completely different situation.

    #244845 Reply
    Avatar Panscan 
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    The unwritten rules of baseball are hilarious to me. Instead of worrying about how your opponent celebrates, why don’t you worry about preventing them from celebrating in first place? Nope, throw a 100 mph pitch at their head. Seems mature and intelligent.

    Most pedantic childish sport

    #244846 Reply
    Avatar Tim 
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    “Nope, throw a 100 mph pitch at their head. Seems mature and intelligent.”
    That is a no-no. Geezzzz. Proper placement is the torso or thigh. Stay away from the head, hands, elbows or feet. The rule is pain or bruising, not to break something or cause permanent injury. That would be barbaric or immature. A clear violation of the unwritten rules.
    Chin music is used to keep the batter from crowding the plate. Zero intent to bean the batter. It’s a warning.

    Dominate, intimidate and physical superiority are part of sports and competition. The problem comes with violating the rules. DQ’d, suspended, banned! The question was about “assault “. The same behavior against your own teammates would result in getting kicked off the team. The point was different behaviors are acceptable in a situation context and why.
    Not whether one agrees or disagrees. Actually, the rules for adolescents are different than the pros.

    #244851 Reply
    Liked by wa2106
    Rogue Dad, M.D. Rogue Dad, M.D. 
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    I’m a baseball fanatic. I find the unwritten rules often silly, but the throwing at someone is idiotic. There is no scenario where intentionally throwing a ball at someone should be ok. If pitchers had aim good enough to ensure they hit exactly what they intended they would be good enough to not throw the pitches that got hammered and thus pissed them off.

    And since a batter is going to try to move/dodge, the pitcher can’t actually control where he may ultimately be hit. Even hitting them where intended can cause serious injury. Throwing inside is fine. Throwing at someone is not. Especially when even bad pitchers throw 90mph now.

    Let players celebrate success. Maybe ratings would be as good as NFL and NHL if people could relate to the players.

    http://www.RogueDadMD.com

    An alt-brown look at medicine, money, faith, and family

    #244852 Reply
    Liked by Zaphod
    Avatar Tim 
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    “Let players celebrate success. Maybe ratings would be as good as NFL and NHL if people could relate to the players.”

    • Sheer joy has never been an issue.
    • NHL? I do believe “fights” and “goons” and “enforcers” would need to be considered for “unwritten rules”. When is it appropriate to have a player that can’t skate shoot, defend or score solely to take the ice and “drop the gloves”? The rule is “no sticks”.
    • Ratings? Completely different business models. Pro franchises are an entertainment business with a bottom line. NFL has the most physical violence and the fewest games. It has far more “dirty plays” with the express intent of causing injury on virtually every play. The culture is so toxic that the players are viewed as disposable pieces to be used up, chewed up and spit out when damaged. It’s in the players contract.

    Hitting an batter is a medium fastball aimed at the middle of the thigh or at the lower back. I think you greatly under estimate the accuracy of a MLB pitcher.

    I know you love the Blues, but the Cards are a great franchise and play by the unwritten rules. By the way, Bob Gibson was not adverse to hitting a batter to make his point. Musial took a few.

    Some people don’t play by the “unwritten rules” and a price is paid. Ventura learned the hard way, a brushback is a message. Nolan Ryan has never been considered a dirty player or a goon. He was perfectly capable of behaving like an adult and respected opponents.
    I don’t think he ever gave a hoot about ratings.

    #244858 Reply
    Rogue Dad, M.D. Rogue Dad, M.D. 
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    NHL

    Click to expand…

    Typo — I meant NBA, not NHL.

    I watch 10000x more MLB than any other sport and have my entire life.  I know the history and nuances of it far more than any other sport.  There is a difference between being professional and walking around with a stick up one’s butt.  The Cardinals, my life long passion, had a stick up their butt with their prior manager.

    Bob Gibson didn’t hit as many people as most people think.  Pretty sure you could ask Musial and he didn’t appreciate having someone throw at him because he did his job.  Or ask the modern “traditional” baseball player — would Pujols or Trout say it’s okay to throw at a batter?  No way.   There are more players being hit by pitches now than ever before.  MLB pitchers got there by being the best at their job yet they still miss the plate routinely.  Giving them the greenlight to throw at people is ridiculous.  Throw inside and brush them off the plate for positioning, yell at them, and celebrate when you get them out the next time.

    The NFL is what it is.  It’s corrupt and puts corporate greed well before the players and people continue to watch it.  I no longer watch it because of the greed and how they treat their pro players.  Their sport was historically based on violence, but even they are having to figure out how to reduce the violence while keeping people interested.  The violence is finally turning people off.  So they’ve slowly modified the rules to make it a game about offense and way less about the big hit.

    Baseball isn’t a game of violence.  Watching a fight in MLB is just ridiculous.  I definitely don’t want to see a star player have a ball thrown at him because he celebrated a HR and then have him break a hand or foot and miss time.  I don’t think Whitey, Tony, Branch Rickey, or any other celebrated Cardinals manager would support that.  Perhaps as you imply the odds of that are low, but it should be zero.

    http://www.RogueDadMD.com

    An alt-brown look at medicine, money, faith, and family

    #244861 Reply
    Avatar madinat 
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    i’m surprised no one has mentioned increasing family obligations with that come with increasing income. very often people’s parent’s (or siblings, nieces, nephews or even cousins!) feel that your wealth is partly theirs too!

    they will guilt trip you for not being more responsible for their poor financial choices (or sometimes just bad luck) until you become a terrible person for not taking care of them. especially when you’re in the business of taking care of people, lol.

    i imagine any high-income earner would have this to deal with. or risk becoming the jerk of the family who “doesn’t care about their own”

    #244870 Reply
    Liked by Eye3md
    Avatar Kamban 
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    I don’t enjoy sports at all and consume <5 hours of sports on a yearly basis, usually much less.

    Click to expand…

    I hardly watch any sports, especially professional ones. I find baseball a snoozefest. In basketball the last 5 mins are like 30 minutes long. I don’t care about NFL but try to keep up with the happening of college football since a top ranked college football team is situated close by and it is a topic of conversation with quite a few of my patients.

    Surprisingly I can tolerate the final hour of a PGA golf, a tight and thrilling tennis match or few minutes of Tour de France. I would rather be outside than waste time in front of a TV watching sports

     

    #244875 Reply
    Liked by Zaphod
    Avatar HikingDO 
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    If I live to be 102 I will never be able to understand the mindset of spending all of your money, not even doing rudimentary tracking, and saving nothing.

    The entire culture of professional sports is a toxic mess from my vantage point. I don’t enjoy sports at all and consume <5 hours of sports on a yearly basis, usually much less. The entire system seems to be riddled with all sorts of problems.

    I have zero interest in watching grown men (or women) punch each other, scream at referees, pout, dive, and/or generally act like children. While youth sports might teach important lessons in diligence and sportsmanship, professional sports seem to systematically reward and tolerate the exact opposite. Every so often I’ll see a CNN clip of some brawl in an MLB game and think, “explain to me why those people aren’t being arrested and charged w/ assault?”

    Click to expand…

    I think I watched double that many hours of football this past weekend alone, and Monday night football isn’t even here yet!:)

    #244907 Reply
    Liked by CordMcNally
    CordMcNally CordMcNally 
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    I have zero interest in watching grown men (or women) punch each other, scream at referees, pout, dive, and/or generally act like children.

    Click to expand…

    You understand that you described our work environments (minus the referees), right? 😉

    “But investing isn’t about beating others at their game. It’s about controlling yourself at your own game.”
    ― Benjamin Graham, The Intelligent Investor

    #244962 Reply
    MPMD MPMD 
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    I have zero interest in watching grown men (or women) punch each other, scream at referees, pout, dive, and/or generally act like children. 

    Click to expand…

    You understand that you described our work environments (minus the referees), right? 😉

    Click to expand…

    100%.

    It’s one of the reasons I find sports so unpalatable.

    Adult humans need to be in control of themselves the vast majority of the time, sports encourages them not to be and rewards thuggish and brutal behavior.

    #244989 Reply
    Liked by Zaphod
    Avatar Tim 
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    By the way, I 100% agree with MPMD regarding

    thuggish and brutal behavior.

    Click to expand…

    The NBA finally figured out how to regulate that..

    Leave the bench, throw a punch, go into the stands, flagrant fouls, hand checks were substantially eliminated. The “unwritten rules” became rules with teeth. Ejections and suspensions were put into place based up not only the referees’, but subsequent reviews of game tape. “No harm no foul” was subject to later review and with game checks on the line, players started feeling it in the pocketbook sitting out multiple game suspensions. The message was clear, hard fouls with the intent of actually playing defense and preventing a score were fine. Go after the player with the intent (who knows how tape shows intent) and it will cost you big time. Trash talk is OK, but not to the referee. It actually allowed “harmless pestering to provoke a retaliation” as an effective players tool. A retaliation for a small bump gets you thrown out and costs the retaliating player big time. The game opened up from the big bodied forwards and center to speed and more scoring. Better product for the fans.

    Every league has the ability to eliminate the thugs. A team can’t do it. You wouldn’t see any bench clearing brawls if the whole team was ejected and had 3 game suspensions.

     

     

    #244999 Reply
    Liked by Zaphod
    Avatar Tim 
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    @Rogue Dad MD,
    Hey, congrats on your Blues. I’d trash talk the Rams for moving.
    Gibson didn’t have to hit many. Unwritten rule, there was absolutely zero doubt he wouldn’t hesitate one bit.
    That’s simply an acknowledgement that he was not a goon, he simply meant business. Great pitcher!

    The finances being thrown at athletes is amazing.

    #245023 Reply
    Avatar Eye3md 
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    i’m surprised no one has mentioned increasing family obligations with that come with increasing income. very often people’s parent’s (or siblings, nieces, nephews or even cousins!) feel that your wealth is partly theirs too!

    they will guilt trip you for not being more responsible for their poor financial choices (or sometimes just bad luck) until you become a terrible person for not taking care of them. especially when you’re in the business of taking care of people, lol.

    i imagine any high-income earner would have this to deal with. or risk becoming the jerk of the family who “doesn’t care about their own”

    Click to expand…

    Yep this is a biggie. Between my brother, and my brother in law, I’ve “loaned” a few hundred thousand dollars over the years. I put loaned in quotes because I figured it was unlikely I would ever get any of it back. This money was always for “your brother is in between jobs, can y’all help them out so they will not lose their house?” or “my business is really struggling with his year. Once the economy picks up, I’ll pay you back”.  Eventually, I had to start acting like a business man, and not a family man, once I opened my eyes to the reality that my brother in law would always be in between jobs and my brother’s business was only breaking even because I propped it up every year.  Strangely enough, my brother in law still loves me and thanks me for helping but my brother rarely speaks to me anymore……I think he believes it’s my fault the business went under because I quit supporting him. Big lessons learned.

    #245215 Reply
    Lordosis Lordosis 
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    Mixing money and family can be disastrous.

    They also expect us to throw money around for every little thing. We bought our house almost a year ago and it has a fancy quartz countertop. There is a small discolored spot where the prior owner put a pot that was too hot down on it. I have had two unrelated incidents where people expect I should redo my kitchen because of it.
    It is a big countertop. It would be crazy expensive. I just put the spoon rest over the spot and called it good.

    “Never let your sense of morals prevent you from doing what is right.”

    #245218 Reply

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