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Second Car, Parking and Convenience

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  • IlliniGopher IlliniGopher 
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    Uber/Lyft 100%

    "Comparison is the thief of joy." - Teddy Roosevelt

    #244122 Reply
    MPMD MPMD 
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    Move to a place where you don’t pay $2k for parking. You’ll probably get paid more outside of the urban metropolis, too.

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    You think the solution to this problem is for the OP to move their family to a new city and change jobs rather than spending $4k/year on a second vehicle vs. continuing to take an occasional $10 uber?

    That’s some really solid advice.

    #244160 Reply
    Liked by Zaphod, LetItToBe
    fatlittlepig fatlittlepig 
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    Weird thread. You’re relying on someone to take you to work and pick you up? That’s ridiculous. Get your own car.

    #244177 Reply
    Avatar LetItToBe 
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    Personally the freedom of not having to coordinate your drop off with your wife and kids schedule would be worth it. The parking fee stings but a second car would not be that expensive.

    #244182 Reply
    Liked by Craigy
    Zaphod Zaphod 
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    I’m a new attending, currently sharing a car with my wife, a SAHM w/ one kid.  This is a car from my training days when budget was tight and one car was do-able.  My current job, we could still get by with one car but I’m wondering if I should get another for convenience or be more “grown up”.  Typically my wife drops me of and picks me up, we have a system and we’re used to it by now, drop offs are easy but pickups can be a hassle at times. I uber sometimes too.  My commute is 3mi, about 10-15mins.  Workplace parking is $2k+/yr.  Parking is what gets me the most and there aren’t any good alternatives.  The car will primarily be my weekday commute car, weekends we usually do things as a family so one car is fine, so total annual mileage will be <5k.  Annual cost, including parking, gas, maintenance and depreciation, is probably $4k or so.  Uber, which I don’t mind taking, is $10 one-way. Public transit is 45min one-way (walking plus an indirect route).

    A part of me feels silly being a doctor but getting dropped off or not driving myself.  But another part of me feels silly spending 4k/yr to drive a car 6mi a day and have it parked for most of the day.  I’m not sure if it’s quite worth it, or if I’m just being too cheap.  Anyone else in similar situations?  What would you do?

    Also, how much do you pay for parking? How much would you be willing to pay for convenience (parking, driving yourself, etc.)?

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    Did this for two years, was no big deal. It is silly we own vehicles and rarely use them day to day, but alternative is worse. If you’re in a field or lifestyle where this is feasible, go for it. At some point you may want a second car, no big deal as well.

    #244547 Reply
    Liked by Tim
    Avatar ITEngineer 
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    If we were to get a car, a used leaf would be one of the options.

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    We love our used Leaf. Got it for < $10k three years ago. The only maintenance costs after 3 years is a new set of tires. Highly recommended. With that short of a drive, you can easily charge on any outlet (though we enjoy our Level 2 charger)

    #244927 Reply
    Liked by Peds
    Avatar mxg67 
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    I might just go the second car route and pay up.  So we went to check out a new Leaf just to see what EV is all about (having never driven one) and the wife is sold on the newer leaf (doesn’t like the old styling) and wants one for herself, whoops.

    #245035 Reply
    Liked by Craigy
    Avatar Kamban 
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    wife is sold on the newer leaf (doesn’t like the old styling) and wants one for herself, whoops.

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    The battery degradation of Leafs is awful, if reports are to be believed. Therefore many people tend to lease Leafs and do not buy them back at the end of the lease. Hence there is a glut of used 3 -4 year old Leafs on sale at low prices.

    The upper end new Leafs are quite expensive in the $40K range and sometimes cost more than Tesla. So be wary of buying a new top of the line Leaf.

    #245051 Reply
    Avatar Kamban 
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    Also read recently that Nissan has a battery swap program for older Leafs in Japan and Europe but has no such program ( or plans for it) in USA.

    #245052 Reply
    Avatar ITEngineer 
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    The battery degradation of Leafs is awful, if reports are to be believed. Therefore many people tend to lease Leafs and do not buy them back at the end of the lease. Hence there is a glut of used 3 -4 year old Leafs on sale at low prices. The upper end new Leafs are quite expensive in the $40K range and sometimes cost more than Tesla. So be wary of buying a new top of the line Leaf.

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    The top of the line 215 mile Leaf does cost around $40k, but that’s before $7500 Federal Tax Credit. You cannot get a Model 3 for $40k and the Tesla tax credit is only $3750 and dropping. The Model 3 is a great car, but you’re going to pay a lot more for it (are you really going to get it without Autopilot? That’s a $6k adder right there where the Leaf is fully loaded with ProPilot Assist.)

    You could get a new 150 Mile Leaf for $32-34k before the $7500 tax rebate. And there are many other electric options out there.

    We have a 2012 Leaf and the battery is down to about 60 miles of usable range. The 2011-2012 were definitely poor batteries for longevity. That said, 60 miles is a lot of range for daily driving and we have never felt stranded. We knew the battery was degraded before we purchased it. Unless you’re getting an old used electric car this won’t be an issue.

    #245528 Reply
    Avatar Tim 
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    “We have a 2012 Leaf and the battery is down to about 60 miles of usable range. ”

    That is about the range I fill up the CRV, Accord, or Civic. I guess it would depend on traffic and if I had time to fill up before I needed to go home. Maybe Texas has longer roads.

    #245529 Reply
    Avatar Kamban 
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    You could get a new 150 Mile Leaf for $32-34k before the $7500 tax rebate. And there are many other electric options out there.

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    I would never consider a 150 mile range unless it is strictly a city car. To improve longevity of the batteries most recommend keeping it between 80 and 10% ( unless you go for long drives, then 95% and down to 10% ). So a typical range is 150 x 0.7 = 105 miles. Add in cold weather, higher speed, rain and headwinds and you can see another 30% decrease. At 75 miles I would not be taking it on long drives but instead be hunting for a next charge station.

    And Nissan does not have the network of Superchargers like Tesla. Even with the 240 mile SR+ I have, I wish for the 325 mile LR-RWD, which they unfortunately do not manufacture any more.

    #245574 Reply
    Avatar Kamban 
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    You cannot get a Model 3 for $40k and the Tesla tax credit is only $3750 and dropping.

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    are you really going to get it without Autopilot? That’s a $6k adder right there where the Leaf is fully loaded with ProPilot Assist.

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    The Tesla credit has fallen to $1875 as of July 1st. I am not sure of the ProPilot assist and I am not sure it has Navigate on demand, Summon etc that costs $6K you talk about. The basic autopilot has all the features I want like enhanced cruise, lane assist, autosteer and it costs only $3K. The basic Model 3 is 35K ( and I almost got it) and the autopilot is 3K more. The 220 mile SR with autopilot is $38K with $1875 credit. The 240 mile SR+, which I have, is $38,900 with the same credit.

    Destination fee is $900 for Nissan, $1200 for Tesla.

    .

    #245578 Reply
    Liked by ITEngineer
    Avatar ITEngineer 
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    I would never consider a 150 mile range unless it is strictly a city car.
    How big of a city are you in? That’s a lot of driving every day. You could be 50 miles outside of a city and range would never be an issue to go in and back.
    To improve longevity of the batteries most recommend keeping it between 80 and 10% ( unless you go for long drives, then 95% and down to 10% ). So a typical range is 150 x 0.7 = 105 miles.
    I don’t disagree with this but if you had to go further than the 70% range, you would charge to 100%. Once again, even if you had a 25 mile one way commute, 105 miles is PLENTY of range for the day.
    Add in cold weather, higher speed, rain and headwinds and you can see another 30% decrease. At 75 miles I would not be taking it on long drives but instead be hunting for a next charge station.

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    When I said 60 usable miles, that included colder weather. In ideal conditions its further. No you would not take a 150 range car for long drives but that’s not it’s purpose. Rain isn’t going to impact range significantly (or at all) and neither are headwinds unless your driving into a hurricane.

    #245588 Reply
    Liked by Kamban
    Avatar Kamban 
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    How big of a city are you in? That’s a lot of driving every day. You could be 50 miles outside of a city and range would never be an issue to go in and back.

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    The city is not big but my commute of taking kid to a distant school and then coming to work plus some trips to hospital during the day and errands to the bank and a construction site is about 80 miles a day. Today I had to add another 80 mile round trip in the evening.

    I don’t disagree with this but if you had to go further than the 70% range, you would charge to 100%. Once again, even if you had a 25 mile one way commute, 105 miles is PLENTY of range for the day.

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    I don’t want it to be a car to take to the office and back. I want it to be a replacement car for the ICE vehicle I have. In that regard the 105 or 150 mile Leaf is not suitable for me. And battery degradation is accelerated on the Leafs. Unless they improve the battery efficiency and have some plan for battery replacement if it degrades quickly, I would pass on buying  a new Leaf.

    On the other hand second hand Leafs are bargains provided one buys knowing the above mentioned issues and lives  with its limitations.

     

     

    #245762 Reply

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