Menu

NYT: Total knee arthroplasty in Mexico

Home General/Welcome NYT: Total knee arthroplasty in Mexico

  • Avatar okayplayer 
    Participant
    Status: Physician
    Posts: 121
    Joined: 05/25/2016

    https://www.google.com/amp/s/www.nytimes.com/2019/08/09/business/medical-tourism-mexico.amp.html

    I’m surprised an orthopod could be bothered to fly to Mexico, miss work in the US, etc for $2700. The article implies he was flying down for this one procedure only.

    Who does the postop care? What happens if there are complications?

    #237959 Reply
    Liked by nfldoc
    Avatar Panscan 
    Participant
    Status: Resident
    Posts: 1018
    Joined: 03/18/2017

    Why can’t they just get post op care in America? I doubt there’s going to be an immediate complication for a knee replacement unless they’re like a raging diabetic or etc.

    Just shows how convoluted and screwed up our system is.

    #237965 Reply
    Avatar SValleyMD 
    Participant
    Status: Physician
    Posts: 453
    Joined: 05/12/2016

    I like the idea.

    The fly down for one case seems a little silly but group 4-10 cases together, pay cash and I can see how that’s appealing

    #237966 Reply
    Liked by hatton1
    PhysicianOnFIRE PhysicianOnFIRE 
    Moderator
    Status: Physician
    Posts: 1535
    Joined: 01/08/2016

    Genuinely curious about the aneshesia. Not surprisingly, there was no mention of it in the article. Anesthesia just happens, right?

    40-something anesthesiologist and personal finance blogger @ https://physicianonfire.com [Part of the WCI Network] Find me on Twitter: @physicianonfire

    FIRE. Financial Independence. Retire Early.

    #237976 Reply
    Avatar G 
    Participant
    Status: Physician, Small Business Owner
    Posts: 1753
    Joined: 01/08/2016

    Genuinely curious about the aneshesia. Not surprisingly, there was no mention of it in the article. Anesthesia just happens, right?

    Click to expand…

    You get what you pay for: a couple aspirin and a local. 😉

     

    #237977 Reply
    Liked by E5797, Zaphod
    Avatar nephron 
    Participant
    Status: Physician
    Posts: 154
    Joined: 05/09/2019

    they probably hire some illegal crna’s do do the anesthesia.

     

    #237981 Reply
    ACN ACN 
    Moderator
    Status: Physician
    Posts: 616
    Joined: 01/08/2016

    He’s making double Medicare reimbursement in cash. Seems like a genius. Do 6 joints in Mexico for cash for the same as 12 in the US with overhead and taxes not included.

    If you're ever having a bad day, just remember in 1976 Ronald Wayne sold his 10% stake in Apple for $2,300.

    #237988 Reply
    Avatar AR 
    Participant
    Status: Physician
    Posts: 832
    Joined: 03/10/2016

    https://www.google.com/amp/s/www.nytimes.com/2019/08/09/business/medical-tourism-mexico.amp.html

    I’m surprised an orthopod could be bothered to fly to Mexico, miss work in the US, etc for $2700. The article implies he was flying down for this one procedure only.

    Who does the postop care? What happens if there are complications?

    Click to expand…

    Did you actually read the article?  It said that a local orthopedic surgeon (who apparently did a fellowship at Harvard) assisted on the case and checked on her post-op.  So it seems like post op care should have been adequate.

    Genuinely curious about the aneshesia. Not surprisingly, there was no mention of it in the article. Anesthesia just happens, right?

    Click to expand…

    They didn’t mention it, but there is no reason they couldn’t do the same thing with an anesthesiologist.  Just set up a day full of cases, pay them a bit of a premium per case, and cover a free trip to Cancun. I’m sure they wouldn’t have much trouble filling that position.

    But it wouldn’t surprise me if your implication is correct. Patients probably don’t even consider anesthesia (at least not nearly as much), so they could just use a local anesthesiologist and most patients wouldn’t think twice.  Just as the journalist didn’t even think to mention it.

    #237993 Reply
    Liked by E5797
    Avatar AR 
    Participant
    Status: Physician
    Posts: 832
    Joined: 03/10/2016

    OK, it looks like this thread is one where some of the posts are missing.   I can only see a few.

    Apologies for double posts and or repetition of something someone else may have already said.

    #237996 Reply
    Avatar okayplayer 
    Participant
    Status: Physician
    Posts: 121
    Joined: 05/25/2016

    Presumably the patient is not staying in Mexico all that long (maybe a week). Who deals with more delayed postop complications, since the surgeon is located nowhere near the patient geographically?

    I would not have anything permanently implanted in me in a third world country to save a few bucks, but that is just me. I’d be very worried about sterilization processes, who is anesthetizing me and what is their competency, etc. I’ll pay my $5,000 copay and sleep in my own bed on POD 1/2, thank you very much.

    #238003 Reply
    Liked by wonka31
    Avatar AR 
    Participant
    Status: Physician
    Posts: 832
    Joined: 03/10/2016

    Presumably the patient is not staying in Mexico all that long (maybe a week). Who deals with more delayed postop complications, since the surgeon is located nowhere near the patient geographically?

    Click to expand…

    You don’t need to presume.  The article stated that she stayed for 10 days.

    The article alludes to the fact that she had a choice of having the procedure done locally, but she was incentivized to go abroad with an additional payment.   So presumably she lives in proximity of surgeons who do knee replacements.  That’s not as ideal as having f/u with the same surgeon for a delayed complication, but it’s not terrible.  Even if she were to develop a complication after a surgery performed here, her surgeon could move, go on vacation, get taken off her insurance plan, etc.

    I would not have anything permanently implanted in me in a third world country to save a few bucks, but that is just me. I’d be very worried about sterilization processes, who is anesthetizing me and what is their competency, etc. I’ll pay my $5,000 copay and sleep in my own bed on POD 1/2, thank you very much.

    Click to expand…

    I’d act the same way, but because I have good insurance and am lucky enough that an extra $5K isn’t going to change my life.  However, I don’t think that there is anything inherently wrong with medical tourism. If my financial situation were different, I would certainly consider it for an elective procedure.  However, I would research it extensively (including all the questions you brought up and more).  Many patients probably couldn’t do this effectively, but I think with enough time and effort, I’m pretty sure I could.    Of course, I could likely earn more than 5K in the time it would take me to research those things to my satisfaction, which is why, like you, I would not take the $5K to go to Mexico.

    #238009 Reply

Reply To: NYT: Total knee arthroplasty in Mexico

In case of a glitch or error, please save your text elsewhere, clear browser cache, close browser, open browser and refresh the page.

Notifications Mark all as read  |  Clear