Menu

Life is short

Home The Lounge Life is short

  • hatton1 hatton1 
    Participant
    Status: Physician
    Posts: 3123
    Joined: 01/11/2016
    Splash Refinancing Bonus

    My college roommate died at 43 from breast cancer leaving behind 3 little kids.  She was a lawyer.  My mother died at 64 from a massive MI.  I was 24. I have seen numerous patients die with breast cancer.  A good friend from residency died of Non-Hodgkins Lymphoma at 33.  He was an anesthesiologist.  I friend from residency committed suicide at 31 with insulin.  My first group had a partner whose daughter committed suicide with a gun.  She was 15.  I have a friend with Non-Hodgkins Lymphoma now.  A friend died from ALS recently.  I think we all see lots of tragedy.  Also see survivors.  Life is short.  Carpe Diem. I found it cathartic to list some of the people I know who have died.

    #122855 Reply
    Avatar HikingDO 
    Participant
    Status: Physician
    Posts: 369
    Joined: 03/09/2017

    Ugh, I have to stop reading this thread, it’s depressing me. I’m going for a hike…

    #122857 Reply
    Avatar Dusn 
    Participant
    Status: Physician
    Posts: 199
    Joined: 01/02/2018

    So one of those common causes of death seems somewhat avoidable. Do you think there would be a benefit in starting a low dose statin at a young-ish age (30-40s) to try to slow down atherosclerosis early on?

    #122877 Reply
    Avatar burritos 
    Participant
    Status: Physician
    Posts: 529
    Joined: 04/23/2018

    So one of those common causes of death seems somewhat avoidable. Do you think there would be a benefit in starting a low dose statin at a young-ish age (30-40s) to try to slow down atherosclerosis early on?

    Click to expand…

    The NNT to prevent a major cardiac event for low risk CVD that has been bandied around is 217.

    NNH(for muscle pain is 21) NNH(for development of DM is 201)(didn’t know this, learned something)

     

    http://www.thennt.com/nnt/statins-persons-low-risk-cardiovascular-disease/

    #122879 Reply
    q-school q-school 
    Participant
    Status: Physician
    Posts: 2640
    Joined: 05/07/2017

    So you are saying there’s a chance!

    #122882 Reply
    Avatar burritos 
    Participant
    Status: Physician
    Posts: 529
    Joined: 04/23/2018

    So you are saying there’s a chance!

    Click to expand…

    Did you know that in Dumb and Dumber, Jim Carrey got $7 million and Jeff Daniels got $50,000. Plus that role screwed up his dramatic career for over 5 years. How messed up is that?

    #122884 Reply
    Avatar trebizond 
    Participant
    Status: Resident
    Posts: 132
    Joined: 12/31/2017

    My parents didn’t do the best financially. We all 4 of us (parents, myself, and sister) went to Yosemite for the 10 days after I graduated from med school. It was a ~$5K trip, something my sister and I put on our credit cards and paid off over succeeding months. Just 3 years later, my father (70) developed a rapidly progressive dementia over a matter of weeks that got him hospitalized for psychosis and later on developed complications of sepsis. Our finances are tenuous 1 year later and he is now in hospice, bedbound, nonverbal, dependent on my mother for everything, likely to die by the end of the year. The experience that has left my sister and I with memories of our father that we revisit over and over again is that 10 day trip in Yosemite. I wouldn’t trade it for anything right now.

    Avatar Anne 
    Participant
    Status: Physician
    Posts: 1233
    Joined: 11/07/2017

    A few years ago my book club was discussing Into Thin Air (spoiler alert: a lot of people die) and we started talking about people we personally knew who had died.  Of the 8 or so women in the group, I was the only one who had had people close to me who were not late 60s or older pass away.   I named 2 friends who had died in car accidents before age 20, another (ER doc) who died in a car accident in his 30s, a friend from high school who died of renal failure at age 30, a cousin with type 1 diabetes who died suddenly in his early 30s, a friend die of GBM age 50, a co-resident who died of breast cancer in her 30s, a close family friend who died of suicide when nobody even suspected anything was wrong in his 40s, a friend who died of a freak accident/fall in his 30s….I was rattling these off and they were horrified.  I on the other hand couldn’t believe they didn’t know anyone personally who had died while still young.  They tried to pass it off as because I was a doctor, but none of these people were my patients.   Perhaps I just know more people because of all the people you meet along the way in medical training?

    Sometimes I want to tell my chronic patients who have no motivation to do anything anymore “you can do anything you lucky bastard–you’re alive! What’s a little pain compared to that?!” (Six Feet Under reference…one of my favorite shows ever).  I’m sure the patient complaints would come rolling in though if I did, so I restrain myself.

    #122888 Reply
    Zaphod Zaphod 
    Participant
    Status: Physician, Small Business Owner
    Posts: 6327
    Joined: 01/12/2016

    A few years ago my book club was discussing Into Thin Air (spoiler alert: a lot of people die) and we started talking about people we personally knew who had died.  Of the 8 or so women in the group, I was the only one who had had people close to me who were not late 60s or older pass away.   I named 2 friends who had died in car accidents before age 20, another (ER doc) who died in a car accident in his 30s, a friend from high school who died of renal failure at age 30, a cousin with type 1 diabetes who died suddenly in his early 30s, a friend die of GBM age 50, a co-resident who died of breast cancer in her 30s, a close family friend who died of suicide when nobody even suspected anything was wrong in his 40s, a friend who died of a freak accident/fall in his 30s….I was rattling these off and they were horrified.  I on the other hand couldn’t believe they didn’t know anyone personally who had died while still young.  They tried to pass it off as because I was a doctor, but none of these people were my patients.   Perhaps I just know more people because of all the people you meet along the way in medical training?

    Sometimes I want to tell my chronic patients who have no motivation to do anything anymore “you can do anything you lucky bastard–you’re alive! What’s a little pain compared to that?!” (Six Feet Under reference…one of my favorite shows ever).  I’m sure the patient complaints would come rolling in though if I did, so I restrain myself.

    Click to expand…

    I think its that you meet a lot of people. Its really an outlier how many people you meet or connect with being a doctor. We meet more new people in a week than most do in a decade if theyre social.

    Though tbh, I am pretty horrified at some of these lists. I can only think of a couple from medical training and a couple from high school thus far, all trauma related.

    #122891 Reply
    Avatar burritos 
    Participant
    Status: Physician
    Posts: 529
    Joined: 04/23/2018

    A few years ago my book club was discussing Into Thin Air (spoiler alert: a lot of people die) and we started talking about people we personally knew who had died.  Of the 8 or so women in the group, I was the only one who had had people close to me who were not late 60s or older pass away.   I named 2 friends who had died in car accidents before age 20, another (ER doc) who died in a car accident in his 30s, a friend from high school who died of renal failure at age 30, a cousin with type 1 diabetes who died suddenly in his early 30s, a friend die of GBM age 50, a co-resident who died of breast cancer in her 30s, a close family friend who died of suicide when nobody even suspected anything was wrong in his 40s, a friend who died of a freak accident/fall in his 30s….I was rattling these off and they were horrified.  I on the other hand couldn’t believe they didn’t know anyone personally who had died while still young.  They tried to pass it off as because I was a doctor, but none of these people were my patients.   Perhaps I just know more people because of all the people you meet along the way in medical training?

    Sometimes I want to tell my chronic patients who have no motivation to do anything anymore “you can do anything you lucky bastard–you’re alive! What’s a little pain compared to that?!” (Six Feet Under reference…one of my favorite shows ever).  I’m sure the patient complaints would come rolling in though if I did, so I restrain myself.

    Click to expand…

    I think its that you meet a lot of people. Its really an outlier how many people you meet or connect with being a doctor. We meet more new people in a week than most do in a decade if theyre social.

    Though tbh, I am pretty horrified at some of these lists. I can only think of a couple from medical training and a couple from high school thus far, all trauma related.

    Click to expand…

    You’re right. Never thought if it that way. Good lesson of the day for me. Thank you.

    #122898 Reply
    Avatar AlexxT 
    Participant
    Status: Physician
    Posts: 897
    Joined: 01/13/2016

    OK, I’ll chime in.  It’s purely anecdotal, and we only know the numerator, not the denominator.  Having said that, there were two people in particular from residency / fellowship I wanted to get in touch with.   These were the two nicest people I had ever met.  I looked them up last year.  One had been found dead at home at age 58,  no cause of death mentioned ( suicide?  MI ? ).  The other had died at 63 due to an unspecified long term degenerative disease culminating in organ failure.  I should have tried to call sooner.

    Two other young attendings from residency had also died ( these were not nice people ) one from ovarian CA, one probably suicide.  A fellow resident died in her 40’s from breast CA.   One classmate died in med school from a rare mediastinal tumor.

    The spouse of another very nice attending died from a bad reaction to a minor procedure.  Another spouse of a fellow resident died from a brain tumor.

    Three childhood friends died in their 20’s.  One MI, one lymphoma, one ? HIV.

    On the other hand, lots of others are alive.

     

     

     

    #122901 Reply
    Vagabond MD Vagabond MD 
    Participant
    Status: Physician
    Posts: 3486
    Joined: 01/21/2016

    A few years ago my book club was discussing Into Thin Air (spoiler alert: a lot of people die) and we started talking about people we personally knew who had died.  Of the 8 or so women in the group, I was the only one who had had people close to me who were not late 60s or older pass away.   I named 2 friends who had died in car accidents before age 20, another (ER doc) who died in a car accident in his 30s, a friend from high school who died of renal failure at age 30, a cousin with type 1 diabetes who died suddenly in his early 30s, a friend die of GBM age 50, a co-resident who died of breast cancer in her 30s, a close family friend who died of suicide when nobody even suspected anything was wrong in his 40s, a friend who died of a freak accident/fall in his 30s….I was rattling these off and they were horrified.  I on the other hand couldn’t believe they didn’t know anyone personally who had died while still young.  They tried to pass it off as because I was a doctor, but none of these people were my patients.   Perhaps I just know more people because of all the people you meet along the way in medical training?

    Sometimes I want to tell my chronic patients who have no motivation to do anything anymore “you can do anything you lucky bastard–you’re alive! What’s a little pain compared to that?!” (Six Feet Under reference…one of my favorite shows ever).  I’m sure the patient complaints would come rolling in though if I did, so I restrain myself.

    Click to expand…

    Great book, one of my faves of all time.

    #122902 Reply
    Liked by hatton1, Anne
    uptoolate uptoolate 
    Participant
    Status: Physician
    Posts: 277
    Joined: 01/31/2016

    Most illustrative for me was one of my best friends from undergrad and medical school.  We were the same age, had taken the same path and were roommates for two years.  Both married classmates and had four children.  He died at 38 of a massive retroperitoneal bleed secondary to a tumour while on a family vacation .

    Also, lost two 22-year-old first year med students from a group I was tutoring in a car accident 7 years ago.

    Life can be short and unfair to be sure.

    #122903 Reply
    Avatar burritos 
    Participant
    Status: Physician
    Posts: 529
    Joined: 04/23/2018

    A few years ago my book club was discussing Into Thin Air (spoiler alert: a lot of people die) and we started talking about people we personally knew who had died.  Of the 8 or so women in the group, I was the only one who had had people close to me who were not late 60s or older pass away.   I named 2 friends who had died in car accidents before age 20, another (ER doc) who died in a car accident in his 30s, a friend from high school who died of renal failure at age 30, a cousin with type 1 diabetes who died suddenly in his early 30s, a friend die of GBM age 50, a co-resident who died of breast cancer in her 30s, a close family friend who died of suicide when nobody even suspected anything was wrong in his 40s, a friend who died of a freak accident/fall in his 30s….I was rattling these off and they were horrified.  I on the other hand couldn’t believe they didn’t know anyone personally who had died while still young.  They tried to pass it off as because I was a doctor, but none of these people were my patients.   Perhaps I just know more people because of all the people you meet along the way in medical training?

    Sometimes I want to tell my chronic patients who have no motivation to do anything anymore “you can do anything you lucky bastard–you’re alive! What’s a little pain compared to that?!” (Six Feet Under reference…one of my favorite shows ever).  I’m sure the patient complaints would come rolling in though if I did, so I restrain myself.

    Click to expand…

    Great book, one of my faves of all time.

    Click to expand…

    Walk in the Woods by Bill Bryson is less dramatic and tragic, but coffee spitting out funny.

    #122906 Reply
    Jaqen Haghar, MD Jaqen Haghar, MD 
    Participant
    Status: Physician
    Posts: 206
    Joined: 07/27/2017

    When I was 12yrs old, I rolled over one weekday morning and looked at the clock. It was way too late for a school day.  I missed the bus already, and no one even bothered to wake me up.  Which was odd.

    In fact, there wasn’t much sound out there at all, I thought.  Which was very odd, as we were a family of seven in a small house.  Mornings were usually a battle-royal.

    I popped out of bed and walked down the hall to the living room.

    The faces.  If you could see the looks on those silent faces.  I still do.  Mortified dread.  So low they might just slide off right onto the floor.  And way too many faces….

    Who were half these people?  Just staring at me silently for a moment….  Finally, I was awake.

    “Jerry died last night,” my mom said to me.

    And that was that.

    I wasn’t stoic back then.  A bit of a class clown and jokester.   My reaction was pretty bad.  I just broke wide open and started sobbing instantly with no questions.  I grabbed my mom and was a mess.

    Apparently he was in a car accident around 9pm coming home from his HS basketball game, 2 miles away.  He died later in the hospital.  He was my second oldest brother and he was sixteen.

    There was a funeral, with a nice black and white picture, and a lot of high school mourners that seemed shaken up.   It was aweful.

    It was my first taste of inevitability.  After that I didn’t joke around much any more.  And I still don’t do well at funerals.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    #122925 Reply

Reply To: Life is short

In case of a glitch or error, please save your text elsewhere, clear browser cache, close browser, open browser and refresh the page.

Notifications Mark all as read  |  Clear