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  • Avatar folkher0 
    Participant
    Status: Physician
    Posts: 7
    Joined: 12/22/2016

    Thanks for the data, team. Great stuff and very useful. The volumes on these surveys are relatively low compared to the ASTS survey that most transplant surgeons typically refer to.  Essentially our whole field (just looked again, over 300 responses) completes it, so I don’t know the biases implicit in the small sample sizes of the other surveys.

    If you don’t believe me about salaries, remember that state university faculty are public employees and salaries are often searchable on the internet.  Obviously total compensation may be in excess of posted salaries, but at least you can get an idea.

    In any case it is very useful stuff and deeply appreciated.

    #238906 Reply
    Liked by childay
    Avatar octopus85 
    Participant
    Status: Resident
    Posts: 222
    Joined: 08/13/2017

    according to an MGMA spreadsheet posted in the medical school subreddit 3 days ago for 2019, general transplant was $452k, kidney $368k, liver $400k if I’m looking at it right. so as others are saying you’re likely being underpaid

    as transplant/hpb are you currently taking in house call or home being 20 minutes away? would that change with your commute being 40 minutes at new place? my limit for commute is 30 minutes personally.

    would you get more procurement opportunities?

    you say your partner is excited to move… happy spouse happy house

    Click to expand…

    I had to pull that reddit thread up:

    https://www.reddit.com/r/medicalschool/comments/cokkn2/serious_2018_mgma_data_for_those_curious/

     

    Like most of the commenters, I’m shocked at the low numbers, and am assuming this is filtered by academic only.

     

    The 2016 MGMA data I have (just a summary) says Transplant (Liver) median is $505k, and Transplant (Kidney) is $401k

    #238921 Reply
    Avatar Tim 
    Participant
    Status: Accountant
    Posts: 2857
    Joined: 09/18/2018

    •There are a number of cost of living calculators that you can use to compare the difference including taxes and housing either rent or own. Some parse the info down to suburbs as well. It’s a mix and match.
    •You are in a sweet spot at the 4 yr mark.
    •Consider the different academic environments. Some value the research side and others more the production and have “supplemental pay” not included in the “public disclosures. Incentive pay can include call coverage and “academic performance goals”.
    • The department “budget” gives some leeway for what’s needed to get the “right person”. How big is the leeway is the unknown. $350k turns into $450k, but that happens with a competitive offer. Base and incentives. The “trick” is to fit in and get them to give the best they can handle.
    • Surveys give averages, but not the size and specific.
    Good luck.

    #238971 Reply
    Avatar Gomer 
    Participant
    Status: Physician
    Posts: 4
    Joined: 07/22/2019
    Splash Refinancing Bonus

    I am in a similar point in my career and family life.  In my surgical subspecialty, which is mostly academic, less than 500k is the norm.  I enjoy my academic practice and living in a smaller city.  If you got an academic job in a competitive field, where some people don’t even get to use their fellowship training, you are probably quite good at your job and enjoy it. Making the absolute most $ does not seem to be your priority.

    That said – with a high housing bill and private schools your financial growth will be slower, even with the raise I suspect.  As others have said, there are a ton of details (RVU-based bonus, practice growth, partner status) that can change the salary at both places.  That commute will be a burden – you may miss some evenings with your family.  Less call would help reduce that hit – but lots of call and long commute will be tough.

    I think the most important thing is long-term career growth.  Is there a better senior mentor at one of these places who would help boost your career?  Is one place too full of big names or other rising stars for you to shine?  Can you negotiate other aspects (call, academic support) that will make you more successful in the long term? If the big city sets you up to excel in your specialty, you will be better for it even if you have to live like a resident longer.  You will also get a better shot at the next job you want.

    Personally, I would not want to move back to a big city unless it was for a dream job.

    #238982 Reply
    Liked by childay, folkher0, Anne, Tim
    Avatar wideopenspaces 
    Participant
    Status: Physician
    Posts: 1095
    Joined: 01/12/2016

    I think if you guys want to move you can definitely make it work on your income. I would consider a housing situation with a shorter commute and access to good public schools, but that’s just me. Good luck making your decision!

    #238984 Reply
    Liked by Zaphod, Tim
    Avatar folkher0 
    Participant
    Status: Physician
    Posts: 7
    Joined: 12/22/2016

    That said – with a high housing bill and private schools your financial growth will be slower, even with the raise I suspect.  As others have said, there are a ton of details (RVU-based bonus, practice growth, partner status) that can change the salary at both places.  That commute will be a burden – you may miss some evenings with your family.  Less call would help reduce that hit – but lots of call and long commute will be tough.

    I think the most important thing is long-term career growth.  Is there a better senior mentor at one of these places who would help boost your career?  Is one place too full of big names or other rising stars for you to shine?  Can you negotiate other aspects (call, academic support) that will make you more successful in the long term? If the big city sets you up to excel in your specialty, you will be better for it even if you have to live like a resident longer.  You will also get a better shot at the next job you want.

    Personally, I would not want to move back to a big city unless it was for a dream job.

    Click to expand…

    This is a great perspective. I’ve been thinking along these lines.

    #239038 Reply
    Liked by Tim
    Avatar Tim 
    Participant
    Status: Accountant
    Posts: 2857
    Joined: 09/18/2018

    Rule #1- Take care of you and your family’s happiness and well being.
    Rule #2- Take care of your professional life in terms of satisfaction and compensation.
    The goal is to balance work and life as much as possible.

    #239099 Reply
    Liked by jacoavlu
    Avatar jdkelso 
    Participant
    Status: Attorney
    Posts: 12
    Joined: 11/30/2018

    I just pulled up the MGMA data.  It is more private practice focused.  The AAMC data is very low.  The MGMA data has academic jobs as well and it is low and similar to the AAMC.

    They have general transplant, heart, heart lung, and liver.  They don’t get super granular because the MGMA data is all based on reporting and when the sample size is low they don’t report.  (So, if you read this make sure your practice reports so the data will be good.)

    The transplant median comp is 503 with 92 responders.

    I help folks with their employment agreements and you really need to decide on the life style changes/issues.  You will have a lot higher costs and the ease of life will be harder for you than your family.  However, your kids are young and you may want to be in a different community before they are school age.  There are more non-financial considerations with your situation than usual, which is probably why you reached out to this community.  For you it seems like it is not all about the money because you can make either work.  The loss of the medical school and research aspect also could end up being more of a bummer than you anticipate.  Plus if it is more private practice, then no M&M..or much less of that….

    I think this move financially will probably be a wash with potentially a more complicated life for you.  The other concern is even if you get a performance bonus, there are only so many organs.  It is not like you can just start marketing and open the flood gates unless you want to change what you do or there are vast improvements in 3d printing or organs.  Patient volume is very important and it would be really important to make sure this new offer has sufficient patient volume, especially if the compensation is based on productivity.

     

    #239180 Reply
    Liked by Tim

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