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HIPAA Nonsense

Home Practice Management HIPAA Nonsense

  • Lordosis Lordosis 
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    Status: Physician
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    Joined: 02/11/2019
    Can you feel me?………….. 

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    After the HIPPA training is the sexual harassment training.

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    HIPAA not HIPPA

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    Thanks I amended my typo.

    “Never let your sense of morals prevent you from doing what is right.”

    #238870 Reply
    Vagabond MD Vagabond MD 
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    Status: Physician
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    Joined: 01/21/2016
    2. No calling patients by name in the waiting room 

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    What are yous supposed to do?  Point and say “Hey you”

     

    It can get ridiculous real quick.  Especially because the vast majority of people who create and enforce these rules never worked in any patient care setting.

     

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    We went through this at our Hospital radiology department. I recommended that when a patient arrives at the department for an exam, he/she should be handed a card with the name of a Disney character and be identified by that name in public through out their visit.

    “Cruella Deville? The IR team is ready for your transvaginal abscess drainage.”

    “Mickey Mouse? The CT tech is ready for your temporal bone CT.” Etc.

     

    Years ago, our Hospital was cited by the state, in the days of paper charts, for the name on the chart being printed too large. Someone with a bionic eye or binoculars could possibly read them from the public area 20 years away. We made them smaller. They came back and said still not small enough, so we made them even smaller. Next, TJC came for the triennial inspection and complained that the patient name on the chart was too small. (“How the hell can you even find the right chart?”) The Chief of Staff threw up his hands, “We can make the font any size, but first you guys have to get together with the state inspector and come to a consensus what size that should be.”

    #238880 Reply
    Zaphod Zaphod 
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    HIPAA actually only applies to very particular types of transmissions of records and only if it bills a third party as well. You’d be shocked at what it really doesnt cover.

    Of course you’re likely to be in trouble for the spirit of the law rather than anything, but a whole lot more is made of it than necessary.

    Saying a pts name is in no way identifying them and their medical/health records, thats just dumb stuff from dumb people.

    #238883 Reply
    Avatar Peds 
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    Status: Physician
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    Just wait till everyone finds out what’s going on on WhatsApp…..

    #238885 Reply
    Lordosis Lordosis 
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    Years ago, our Hospital was cited by the state, in the days of paper charts, for the name on the chart being printed too large. Someone with a bionic eye or binoculars could possibly read them from the public area 20 years away. We made them smaller. They came back and said still not small enough, so we made them even smaller. Next, TJC came for the triennial inspection and complained that the patient name on the chart was too small. (“How the hell can you even find the right chart?”) The Chief of Staff threw up his hands, “We can make the font any size, but first you guys have to get together with the state inspector and come to a consensus what size that should be.”

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    “Pleasing one king is difficult enough. Pleasing two is hardly possible.”

    ― George R.R. Martin

    “Never let your sense of morals prevent you from doing what is right.”

    #238888 Reply
    Avatar Ghetto 
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    Status: Physician
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    Joined: 08/13/2017

    We do all this HIPAA crap and then my patients sit in the waiting room and discuss their recent prostate procedures with each other. It’s ridiculous

    #238901 Reply
    Lordosis Lordosis 
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    Status: Physician
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    I live and work in a small town.  I have had people tell me and show me all kinds of thinks in public places.

     

    “Never let your sense of morals prevent you from doing what is right.”

    #238902 Reply
    Avatar NESW 
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    Status: Physician
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    I had wondered about this too; calling patients in the waiting room, sign-in sheets etc. and HIPAA rules.

    Came across this info, which suggests calling a patient in the waiting room by name and using sign-in sheets may be fine.

    https://www.kevinmd.com/blog/2013/07/3-biggest-hipaa-myths-debunked.html

     

    #238904 Reply
    Liked by Craigy
    Avatar orthodds 
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    The law says you have to take reasonable measures to protect personal health information (PHI).  This is individually identifiable health information.  Calling “John” or “Susan” to come back for their exam is not a violation.  Anyone who says it is a violation is probably trying to sell you on a HIPAA compliance package they offer.

    #238927 Reply
    Avatar orthodds 
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    HIPAA actually only applies to very particular types of transmissions of records and only if it bills a third party as well. You’d be shocked at what it really doesnt cover.

    Of course you’re likely to be in trouble for the spirit of the law rather than anything, but a whole lot more is made of it than necessary.

    Saying a pts name is in no way identifying them and their medical/health records, thats just dumb stuff from dumb people.

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    HIPAA applies to you if you transmit certain info electronically.  Once it does apply to you it applies to any personal health information (PHI) used at any time and in any way by you or your clinic/office/hospital in the provision of health care services. The details are murky.  The fines are potentially huge.  The law itself is BS for the most part.

    #238929 Reply
    Zaphod Zaphod 
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    HIPAA actually only applies to very particular types of transmissions of records and only if it bills a third party as well. You’d be shocked at what it really doesnt cover.

    Of course you’re likely to be in trouble for the spirit of the law rather than anything, but a whole lot more is made of it than necessary.

    Saying a pts name is in no way identifying them and their medical/health records, thats just dumb stuff from dumb people.

    Click to expand…

    HIPAA applies to you if you transmit certain info electronically.  Once it does apply to you it applies to any personal health information (PHI) used at any time and in any way by you or your clinic/office/hospital in the provision of health care services. The details are murky.  The fines are potentially huge.  The law itself is BS for the most part.

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    If you went by how crazy people act about it you couldnt find the pts to treat.

    #238954 Reply
    Avatar orthodds 
    Participant
    Status: Dentist
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    HIPAA is one of many reasons I will never vote for a politician who favors “big government.”

    #239224 Reply
    IntensiveCareBear IntensiveCareBear 
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    Status: Physician
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    The thing to remember with HIPAA is that you just need to train your staff to do their reasonable best. It doesn’t have to be perfect.

    Clipboards/charts and results sheets or faxes should be face down/away on countertops or exam room doors… that doesn’t apply to private doc offices/desks or nursing areas. You should call waiting room patients by first or last name (not both) or can avoid name if the assistant knows the return patient by face. You should refer to patients by room or bed number or other non-name identifiers when in the hall, on rounds, at desk near other patients, etc when you are communicating to staff who needs injection or xray or whatever. Info or results should not be given out on the phone and you shouldn’t even confirm that the patient name is seen at your office unless it is the patient themselves calling. Try a sticker sheet for the sign in, use a ipad, or have your desk girls black out names as they register them. Shred all papers with patient names on them. What the rep was telling OP is pretty much common sense these days; she wasn’t being nitpicky… although maybe her delivery of the info came off that way to someone ignorant of the requirements. Again, you don’t have to do perfect, just aim to use common sense and not flaunt patient names or other ID info. I would fully agree with her that face up/out clipboards or charts needs to be fixed asap, though.

    …Our profession is so old and so red-taped with attorneys and admins and biz and govt and financials and tech and everyone else trying to get a piece of the pie that it is highly inefficient and minimally profitable anymore. It’s sad. All you can really do is try your best to comply in basic terms and transcend the nonsense documentation, consent, privacy, coding, accessibility, conduct, ever changing tech, etc etc etc requirements and manuals which are often thicker than phone books. Take better care of your patients than your notes is all you can do.

    It’s all just a game. A box to check and move on

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    Basically, yes^

    "Hmm, that sounds risky." - motto of the middle class

    #239310 Reply
    Avatar jacoavlu 
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    frustrating thing is, texting of non-emergent exam results is so convenient for the doc on both ends, and benefits patient care, but there is not a widely adopted HIPAA compliant means for that communication.

    The Finance Buff's solo 401k contribution spreadsheet: https://goo.gl/6cZKVA

    #239315 Reply
    Craigy Craigy 
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    I believe it’s called an “incidental disclosure.”

    The chart on the door could be a violation.  You could argue that the whole concept of a patient waiting room breaches the patient’s confidentiality.  But how far does that extend.  What about the parking lot, etc.

    Regardless, you should consult a qualified attorney in your area.  🙂

    LEVEL 1 WCI FORUM MEMBER.

    #239318 Reply

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