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Do you have a “Go Bag”?

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  •  SLC OB 
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    Status: Physician
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    Joined: 06/23/2018
    Earnest refinancing bonus
    Even if you havent hurt yourself, if you’re lost suture equipment is small/light and can be used to fashion all kinds of useful stuff.

    Click to expand…

    Yep, totally agree!

    Although I have to say… his first aid kit, since made for car/raft travel, is not small nor light.

    I have it in a waterproof pelican box and is quite extensive (extreme?)… but weight is not the issue on those types of trips, unlike a backpacking trip.

    #179095 Reply
    Jaqen Haghar, MD Jaqen Haghar, MD 
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    Status: Physician
    Posts: 117
    Joined: 07/27/2017

    More for the sake of argument than to be argumentative but I can’t imagine a situation in which I would close a wound with sutures “in the field” so to speak.

    If you are placing deep sutures anywhere but a hospital bay you are almost certainly doing something wrong.

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    I do carry a couple of packs of 4-0 ethilon in my backpacking med kit.  Not sure of the weight, but the entire kit is about the size of my hand and a couple inches thick.  Worth having if you know how to deploy them and you are a full day’s hike, and then ? hours drive to the nearest area of cell phone reception.

    I don’t worry about it for a highway accident though, but some people go out to places where even if you have and activate a distress beacon, it will probably be a very long time before you get any help.

    I find that for kit-making, the experiences of long distance back packers (Appalachian Trail, CDT, PCT through hikers) trumps the survivalist specific sources of info. The survivalists are usually about paramilitary styling, weird emphasis on heavy weapons, and not enough thought of water, food, shelter and clothing.

    #179099 Reply
    Zaphod Zaphod 
    Participant
    Status: Physician, Small Business Owner
    Posts: 4917
    Joined: 01/12/2016

    More for the sake of argument than to be argumentative but I can’t imagine a situation in which I would close a wound with sutures “in the field” so to speak.

    If you are placing deep sutures anywhere but a hospital bay you are almost certainly doing something wrong.

    Click to expand…

    I do carry a couple of packs of 4-0 ethilon in my backpacking med kit.  Not sure of the weight, but the entire kit is about the size of my hand and a couple inches thick.  Worth having if you know how to deploy them and you are a full day’s hike, and then ? hours drive to the nearest area of cell phone reception.

    I don’t worry about it for a highway accident though, but some people go out to places where even if you have and activate a distress beacon, it will probably be a very long time before you get any help.

    I find that for kit-making, the experiences of long distance back packers (Appalachian Trail, CDT, PCT through hikers) trumps the survivalist specific sources of info. The survivalists are usually about paramilitary styling, weird emphasis on heavy weapons, and not enough thought of water, food, shelter and clothing.

    Click to expand…

    Agree. You really need only a few things. A handheld beacon would be on my priority list though. Getting water, fire and shelter are probably all you need to make a stand and survive. You can go a long time without food. Water and exposure can make quick work of anyone though. Get a fire going and you’re probably going to have a real chance. Which is all you’re trying to do really, not be able to pop up a cabin and sustain off the grid living, its a risk/reward balance.

    I was just looking at some bug out bag sites and car bags, and they still promote those emergency multi tools for windows and seat belts. If you have anything of a newer cars those windows dont break, and there are easier/faster ways to cut a seat belt. Have to stay up to date.

    If anyone hasnt read “Deep Survival” on this thread Im going to guess you’ll enjoy it. Like most books it could have been quicker and things were repeatedly marked upon, but I could have read stories of people getting lost hiking, climbing accidents, adrift on the sea, and otherwise for a lot longer.

    #179103 Reply
     mpdoc 
    Participant
    Status: Physician
    Posts: 23
    Joined: 04/05/2017

    I keep a small plastic tub of really basic first aid supplies in the car – gloves, 4x4s, tape, kerlix, small ACE wraps, scissors, tweezers, etc in the car.  Have used it to patch up the occasional abrasion at an outdoor sporting activity.  Have a few sutures trays at the house mostly because my spouse is very obstinate about going to the ED as I learned the hard way. 🙂  Have a slightly different kit for backpacking including emergency blankets and water purification tabs, etc.  SWAT-T and SAM splint roll wouldn’t be bad additions.  I take a small pharmacy along when I travel internationally.

    In addition to having the supplies is the ability to think creatively and improvise in a pinch.  I fell and broke my wrist in grade school at a birthday party and having a bystander nurse take charge and improvise a splint with a flattened roll of half used up paper towel and masking tape.  I vividly remember how much less it hurt after being immobilized and the ED doctor laughing at it but admitting that it was a great idea.

     

    #179119 Reply
    hatton1 hatton1 
    Participant
    Status: Physician
    Posts: 2733
    Joined: 01/11/2016

    Where I live the threat is from tornados not fire.  If it hits your house ….oh well.  The last really bad one knocked out the electricity for about a week.  I am looking at a house that has a whole house automatic generator.

    #179506 Reply
    Liked by Tim
     IntensiveCareBear 
    Participant
    Status: Physician
    Posts: 15
    Joined: 12/22/2018

    Since he clarified, what the answer is would be simply a house call bag or medic field kit. That would be basic suture and bandage stuff with a few topical and a few tablet Rx… the type of thing we should all be bringing on non-first world foreign vacations anyways (esp abx for food poisoning). It’s probably best to pack it yourself so you know contents and arrangement well.

    …What nearly everyone (myself included) thought he meant is usually called a bug out bag or go bag or get home bag (most appropriate name imo). It is just usually 3 days of warmth/water/food/shelter and a way to help keep you alive until rescued or get you home (or to destination). I have one in the back of my truck, and again, it is best to think a bit and pack it yourself and occasionally go camp with it. Unless you have the skills, it doesn’t do nearly as much good as it could.

    I agree that some people go way too overboard on weapons while others are wayyy too “live off the land” with planning too long term for hunting and fishing and etc. Again, it is just something to improve your chances if you skid off the road in a blizzard, mass hysteria broke out and freeway gridlock forced you to hike home, or other unpredictable weather or chaos. For me, I kept it cheap and basic with stuff that all weighs under 12-15lbs or so (depending if you take the wool blanket with) and harmonizes well together:

    Knife (nothing crazy but good enough to last… and be a weapon if needed), Multi Tool, Duct Tape, Zip ties

    H20 filter straw, metal canteen, sillcock key
    Lighters, Flint stick, Cotton balls + Vaseline
    Bandana x2, mil Poncho with grommets, Gloves, Sunglasses, Xtra base layer wicking clothes (wool blanket, boots are available to also grab if winter)
    Garbage bags, Solar blanket, Tent stakes
    Food gel, jerky, trail mix
    Radio/Flashlight, Map + Compass
    First Aid (gauze, tape, band aids, abx oint, ibuprof, keflex)
    Toiletries basic kit
    Click to expand…

    Agree. You really need only a few things. A handheld beacon would be on my priority list though. Getting water, fire and shelter are probably all you need to make a stand and survive. You can go a long time without food. Water and exposure can make quick work of anyone though. Get a fire going and you’re probably going to have a real chance…

    Click to expand…

    Yeah, concur. Everyone keys in on food and water or tools/weapons, but the elements are not to be underestimated. Cold or dehydration can kill you in a few hours or less (and sap your morale, coordination, and thought power in just minutes).

    A poncho (or set of climate-optimal clothes) would be top choice item if I was getting dropped far from home and could only have one thing. Metal bottle would be second place… sucks being at the complete mercy of going water source to source… and often getting yourself wet to get water from puddles or rivers or lakes. After that, a knife or cutting tool as 3rd choice really helps to make many more tools. Fire starting tool would be honorable mention (for morale, water purification, light to work after dusk, signal, warmth, keep away dangers, etc etc etc), and friction fires are basically impossible for anyone without significant skill and optimally low humidity.

    #179582 Reply
    Liked by Zaphod

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