Menu

Commute Distance and Call

Home Mortgages and Home Buying Commute Distance and Call

  • Avatar Firefly 
    Participant
    Status: Physician
    Posts: 41
    Joined: 07/31/2018

    I am a general surgeon and used to live about 25 minutes away and ended up taking in house call to avoid the drive or uncertainty in trying to sort things out by phone.  Slept on my office floor many times.  Now we live 2 blocks away, this was a game changer and a huge improver of QOL.  It is so easy to come and go home for meals, breaks, to say hello to spouse between things, make early morning and rush hour meetings. I also never hesitate to walk to the ED to see a patient in order to make a decision, and I sleep better for it between pages.  My partners who live farther away often exchange several phone calls with the ED between labs and CT scans rather than come in, and by that time I am in and out and have the plan already made and am back in bed.   Agree with Anne to rent as close as you can then decide what living situation would be optimal.

    ENT Doc ENT Doc 
    Participant
    Status: Physician
    Posts: 3517
    Joined: 01/14/2017

    I would offer a slight modification to the above formula. A baseline level of annoyance will exist given minimum safe distance from the hospital. You can’t do anything about this. I’d look at marginal annoyance and also discount that by the utility of any call income.

    #176773 Reply
    Vagabond MD Vagabond MD 
    Participant
    Status: Physician
    Posts: 3477
    Joined: 01/21/2016

    I would offer a slight modification to the above formula. A baseline level of annoyance will exist given minimum safe distance from the hospital. You can’t do anything about this. I’d look at marginal annoyance and also discount that by the utility of any call income.

    Click to expand…

    I think the annoyance factor takes into account the nature and financial renumeration of the call-in. As an IR, if I am called in on a Saturday morning at 10A  for a one-hour, life-saving procedure that is fun and gratifying to do, raises my reputation in the Hospital, and earns me a cool thousand bucks, the annoyance factor is quite low. If I am called in to talk to the snot-nosed Albany Medical College med student (in the above example, late Saturday afternoon, etc.) about his great, great Aunt Beulah’s scheduled thyroid FNA on Monday afternoon because he has to return to Albany that afternoon for a pub crawl, well, the annoyance factor is through the roof AND there is no compensation for the call-in!

    "Wealth is the slave of the wise man and the master of the fool.” -Seneca the Younger

    #176794 Reply
    Avatar Tim 
    Participant
    Status: Accountant
    Posts: 3073
    Joined: 09/18/2018

    1) I’m looking at anything from a condo across the street
    2) I’m looking at anything from a condo across the street
    3) I’m looking at anything from a condo across the street

    Any of the above work with taking an Uber to the urban scene. Pick which floor plan you like.

    #176798 Reply
    Avatar mxg67 
    Participant
    Status: Physician
    Posts: 82
    Joined: 11/25/2016

    Thanks for the great thoughts so far.  Just to tack another thought, how, if at all, have any of you wrestled with commute, housing and cost?  For example, if the hospital is in the city, choosing to live in a condo nearby vs a house further out, choosing to rent vs buy, buying a expensive house near the city vs cheaper house further out, etc.

    #176803 Reply
    hatton1 hatton1 
    Participant
    Status: Physician
    Posts: 3064
    Joined: 01/11/2016

    The first step is to rent the nearby condo.  The worst thing you can do is buy a house and not like the job.  Or the job does not like you.  Renting gives the opportunity to really look for a house with no time pressure and check out commute times at different times of the day and night.

    #176804 Reply
    Avatar bean1970 
    Participant
    Status: Physician
    Posts: 550
    Joined: 07/12/2017

    depending where you live…distance and time may be discordant.  We used to live 10 miles from the hospital…some days, most days especially before we moved, it would take over an hour to get home.  i should have walked but it is dangerous to walk on the interstate…   Where we live now, when i first moved here there was no stoplight at the exit of our neighborhood and it took 3 minutes to get to the interstate….now there is a stoplight and it takes 10 minutes to get to the interstate due to the crazy expansion and influx of people/homes where we live.. three extra lights on the road that use to be without stoplights (and now there is a  walmart)…backed up sometimes you sit through 2-3 lights….so commute times may change especially if you live in suburbia where they keep building homes.  They are now building a chick-fil-a on the road…..i can’t wait until the cars are backed up onto the road……ugh…..  but most importantly, i don’t have call :)…..but just keep in mind especially over time commute times can change (probably mostly for worse, maybe some better).

    #176812 Reply
    Liked by hatton1
    Drop it into MD Drop it into MD 
    Participant
    Status: Physician
    Posts: 440
    Joined: 09/20/2018

    I live 3 miles from my hospital/office.  Small town community hospital so 3 miles is a 3-4 minute drive door to door.  Sometimes after a stressful day I wish the drive was longer giving me the chance to unwind/ listen to audiobooks.  However I cannot tell you how many advantages there are to being so close.  It is easy for me to go home for 30 min for lunch with my family.  I can attend school functions right after work or even mid day if I have time to plan my schedule.  Forgetting your laptop, phone, wallet, etc.  at home or work is a minor annoyance not a big deal.  Car maintenance and gas costs are super low.  And in the case of a true emergency you can be there that much quicker.  Except sometimes this backfires if it is well known you are close and will help out in a pinch.

    So yeah to answer your question living close is great.  But that is just one factor in finding a place to live.

    #176816 Reply
    Avatar Tim 
    Participant
    Status: Accountant
    Posts: 3073
    Joined: 09/18/2018

    “if at all, have any of you wrestled with commute, housing and cost? For example, if the hospital is in the city, choosing to live in a condo nearby vs a house further out, choosing to rent vs buy, buying a expensive house near the city vs cheaper house further out, etc.”

    You rent the nearby condo as step one. Just because you “can” is not a reason to buy. The least expensive option that meets your needs. “Can” is the maximum housing dollars available. For all you know, leasing with a long commute in the suburbs might perfectly suit your needs after your condo stay. Lease until you make up your mind.

    #176819 Reply
    portlandia portlandia 
    Participant
    Status: Physician
    Posts: 401
    Joined: 07/07/2017
    Splash Refinancing Bonus

    … how, if at all, have any of you wrestled with commute, housing and cost?  For example, if the hospital is in the city, choosing to live in a condo nearby vs a house further out, choosing to rent vs buy, buying a expensive house near the city vs cheaper house further out, etc

    For me, commute time is one of the top items when considering where to live. Having a short commute is an investment that pays daily dividends. The same cannot be said of all the features people want in a home. Are you glad EVERY day that you have that extra room that you haven’t used in 2 weeks? What about that soaker tub that you haven’t used in a year?

    Because I live so close to work, I never check traffic reports, don’t care about construction delays or even the weather. If a blizzard hits and the roads are treacherous, I can snow shoe to work. And I don’t waste hours every week stuck in soul crushing traffic while being acutely aware of my severe lack of patience for the #*!#* drivers around me!

    Choosing to rent vs buy is an entirely different question than proximity to work. Please read more on this site about why buying right out of residency/fellowship is not wise, there are too many variables that have to go just right for you to come out ahead vs renting. Don’t assume you will be the exception to the rule.

     

     

    #176891 Reply
    Avatar bean1970 
    Participant
    Status: Physician
    Posts: 550
    Joined: 07/12/2017
    For me, commute time is one of the top items when considering where to live.

    Click to expand…

    Yes, but other considerations include commute time of spouse and often school district.  I knew families where mom’s commute was 5 minutes, meanwhile Dad drove kids to private school AN HOUR each way (and vice versa scenarios).  when others are involved (spouse and kids) it can become more complicated in the grand scheme of the perfect commute for everyone. and sometimes there is a change to where you are actually going….practice moves office buildings, you need to cover another hospital across town because your group agreed to it, blah blah… i’m 20 minutes from the medical school and currently new medical school is under construction which is another 20-30 minute commute from current location.  this was not even on the radar at the time we moved where we are now…  i think figure out what works best and realize things can get better or worse from there…….

    #176928 Reply
    q-school q-school 
    Participant
    Status: Physician
    Posts: 2629
    Joined: 05/07/2017

    Maybe just semantics, but if it’s not at least urgent I’m not going in at night. Being forced to go in at night for non urgent would be super high annoyance factor for me. Consequently I would want to be close. I’m currently twenty minutes away and that’s on the limits of too far.

    #177001 Reply
    Vagabond MD Vagabond MD 
    Participant
    Status: Physician
    Posts: 3477
    Joined: 01/21/2016

    Maybe just semantics, but if it’s not at least urgent I’m not going in at night. Being forced to go in at night for non urgent would be super high annoyance factor for me. Consequently I would want to be close. I’m currently twenty minutes away and that’s on the limits of too far.

    Click to expand…

    While I agree and always hated to come in on call for non-urgent matters, I have learned over the years these two things:

    1. It is usually more urgent to the person asking for the consult/procedure than it would be to me. Of course, they are on the ground dealing with the patient and family and have to deal with the consequences if they misjudge and underestimate the degree of urgency. Better to err on the site of caution (read: greater urgency).

    2. The only way I can really determine whether they are right or wrong about the level of urgency is to check it out myself.

    "Wealth is the slave of the wise man and the master of the fool.” -Seneca the Younger

    #177083 Reply
    q-school q-school 
    Participant
    Status: Physician
    Posts: 2629
    Joined: 05/07/2017

    Maybe just semantics, but if it’s not at least urgent I’m not going in at night. Being forced to go in at night for non urgent would be super high annoyance factor for me. Consequently I would want to be close. I’m currently twenty minutes away and that’s on the limits of too far.

    Click to expand…

    While I agree and always hated to come in on call for non-urgent matters, I have learned over the years these two things:

    1. It is usually more urgent to the person asking for the consult/procedure than it would be to me. Of course, they are on the ground dealing with the patient and family and have to deal with the consequences if they misjudge and underestimate the degree of urgency. Better to err on the site of caution (read: greater urgency).

    2. The only way I can really determine whether they are right or wrong about the level of urgency is to check it out myself.

    Click to expand…

    totally agree.  that’s the problem with being conscientious.  the more ethical you are, the closer you have to live to the hospital.  don’t forget these days, not only do you have to come in, you have to come in with a smile on your face and at least nominally address any concern?  valet parking slow?  i’ll get right on that.  trash can outside hospital overflowing–thank you for bringing that to my attention.

    it was just worded oddly (to me) in the original post.  if we assume if it is factually agreed upon that the matter is non-urgent, why would anyone come in at night for it?

     

    #177091 Reply
    Liked by Vagabond MD
    Avatar artemis 
    Participant
    Status: Physician
    Posts: 593
    Joined: 12/02/2016

    if we assume if it is factually agreed upon that the matter is non-urgent, why would anyone come in at night for it?

    Click to expand…

    Exactly.  It may not be truly emergent where every minute matters, but if an after-hours page is causing you to go back the hospital, by definition it’s urgent (as whatever it is can’t simply wait until morning).

    For at-home call, proximity to the hospital matters a lot.  Minimize your commute and maximize your sleep on call nights!

    #177166 Reply
    Liked by Vagabond MD

Reply To: Commute Distance and Call

In case of a glitch or error, please save your text elsewhere, clear browser cache, close browser, open browser and refresh the page.

Notifications Mark all as read  |  Clear