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Medical Convention Cancels on San Francisco Because Its Streets Are So Distressi

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  • #46
    Says semiannual conference. Most American Association of whatever conferences are annual. Tons of planning goes into those and to do it twice yearly would be a huge strain on their staff. Someone is either lying, or it's not actually based in Chicago, or not provider related but perhaps device manufacturers or malpractice attorneys. If the latter SF should be grateful they aren't getting a bolus of refuse to their poop-ridden city.

    In all seriousness, it's fun to rag on SF I suppose, but I've been there twice and loved visiting each time. Last time I was there was 2010 so maybe it's gone downhill since. If so that's a shame. Or maybe I just stuck to better areas.

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    • #47
      I live in the bay area but rarely go into San Francisco.  The last time I did, a few months ago,  even I was shocked by the sheer number of homeless people on the streets, everywhere I looked.   I keep hearing about the "homeless problem" on the radio, but I thought it was just whining until I saw how bad the problem really is.   No way I would want to live in SF proper.

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      • #48
        The first time I ever went to SF (it was for a conference), I was in a car on the way to convention center (which as mentioned in not in the best part of town).   It was about noon on a weekday and I was stopped at a traffic light when I saw a woman casually defecating on the sidewalk.  It was just so weird, because there were lots of pedestrians walking right by here like it was a totally normal thing.

        I've been many times since, while I've seen a good number of homeless people about, I never seen anything like that since.  Never any safety concerns and always have had a great time.  But SF had a tough first impression to overcome.

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        • #49
          I work in SF and everything you hear about homelessness is true. I walk by two different tent cities on my 15 minute walk to work. Until a couple of years ago, I had to only watch for feces on the street when I walked, now I have to be careful since there are needles everywhere. I counted atleast a dozen this evening in my way back from work. The situation is bad only in some neighborhoods, most of SF is still very nice.

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          • #50
            I think it'd be hilarious if normal people started defecating on the street/sidewalk but only in SF proper.

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            • #51
              My friend from Philippines said that he had to do rural year internship after medical school. During that year he learned that people take craps on the road. If car comes by, they cover their face with newspaper for privacy. Instinctively if I had to crap outside I for sure would be covering my private parts. Ha ha.

              One of my closest friends called me one day. She has three kids. Four, two, and one at the time. She was in her minivan and new she had to pee. She parked in Walmart and realized she couldn’t get her kids into Walmart in time to pee so she parked behind Walmart and peed into lot. Then she started crying cause she felt loss of dignity and control of her life. Hen she called me and laughed.

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              • #52
                We go to SF every so often as we have some family there. It has noticeably changed in the last five years for sure. However, the same is true of all large CA cities. Santa Monica (more in the city, beach/path fine) is now totally unenjoyable as the homeless population is so large it feels like theyre everywhere and they can be very aggressive. We used to be in that area all the time, but its just not safe feeling or pleasant at all.

                 

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                • #53
                  My first time in SF was August 2014. On the ride from the Airport to my hotel at Fisherman's Wharf we approached a busy intersection near Union Square, a group of homeless/panhandlers blocked a green light and would not let traffic through until they received some handouts. I've never seen anything like it.

                  Throughout the week I couldn't believe the number of people living on the streets. I don't recall seeing any needles (but I wasn't looking for them) but I felt that there were multiple homeless sleeping on every block throughout the city.

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                  • #54
                    We occasionally wander down from the mountains for our fix of "culture"--aggressive panhandling is probably the biggest distress in my mind.  I always thought that my attitude changed over time because I went from single (and poor) to family (with money)...but this thread makes me wonder if it is also the decline of the city itself.

                    I chuckled at the comment that folks that are complaining don't get out much.

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                    • #55




                      My first time in SF was August 2014. On the ride from the Airport to my hotel at Fisherman’s Wharf we approached a busy intersection near Union Square, a group of homeless/panhandlers blocked a green light and would not let traffic through until they received some handouts. I’ve never seen anything like it.
                      Click to expand...


                      Wow. I guess I can see something like that flying in California. I feel like if that happened in some other parts of the US. The panhandlers would have be forcibly removed from the intersection.

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                      • #56
                        There are more homeless people here for a few reasons.  One, the weather is nice, so some homeless people migrate here for the weather, just like rich people do.   Also, people move west until they hit the ocean.  Plus, since the weather is nice, it's easier to live out on the streets where they are more visible.

                        Also, a certain proportion of them are middle class people who missed a paycheck and got evicted.  They now can't afford the high rent ( 2 months plus security deposit ).  Of course, most of the homeless seem to have drug and/or mental health issues.

                        They defecate in the street because they have nowhere else to go.

                        For years, I have noticed a long line of campers/RVs parked along the main drag here, El Camino Real, in front of some Stanford sports fields.  I had always assumed that  they belonged to families visiting students.  I just found out, through a newspaper article, that they belong to homeless people living in RVs.  That's one of the only places they can park for days without being forced to move by the police.

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                        • #57
                          Just one note of perspective -- for anyone who thinks the homeless situation in SF is bad, go visit South Asia.  My parents are from Pakistan and we used to go every ~2 years, though I have not been in awhile for a few reasons.

                          SF has nothing on Karachi (or probably Mumbai or other similar cities).
                          An alt-brown look at medicine, money, faith, & family
                          www.RogueDadMD.com

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                          • #58




                            The situation is bad only in some neighborhoods, most of SF is still very nice.
                            Click to expand...


                            The problem, though, is that the places that tourists come to San Francisco to visit are in or very near the bad areas.




                            Just one note of perspective — for anyone who thinks the homeless situation in SF is bad, go visit South Asia.  My parents are from Pakistan and we used to go every ~2 years, though I have not been in awhile for a few reasons.

                            SF has nothing on Karachi (or probably Mumbai or other similar cities).
                            Click to expand...


                            Maybe "San Francisco - at least we're better than Mumbai!" should be the city's new tourism logo?  Or maybe "San Francisco - experience Third-World squalor without the expense of international airfare!' would work better?  

                            I do feel sorry for the city, though - it's a tough problem to solve, especially when laws make it all-but-impossible to commit people to inpatient psych units and drug rehab against their will. It's not simply that their are a lot of homeless people there that is causing the threat to tourism, it's that a significant percentage of them behave in ways that make ordinary people feel unsafe.

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                            • #59




                              There are more homeless people here for a few reasons.  One, the weather is nice, so some homeless people migrate here for the weather, just like rich people do.   Also, people move west until they hit the ocean.  Plus, since the weather is nice, it’s easier to live out on the streets where they are more visible.

                              Also, a certain proportion of them are middle class people who missed a paycheck and got evicted.  They now can’t afford the high rent ( 2 months plus security deposit ).  Of course, most of the homeless seem to have drug and/or mental health issues.

                              They defecate in the street because they have nowhere else to go.

                              For years, I have noticed a long line of campers/RVs parked along the main drag here, El Camino Real, in front of some Stanford sports fields.  I had always assumed that  they belonged to families visiting students.  I just found out, through a newspaper article, that they belong to homeless people living in RVs.  That’s one of the only places they can park for days without being forced to move by the police.
                              Click to expand...


                              There is a book written about that (on a national level) called Nomadland: Surviving America in the 21st Century.

                              https://www.nytimes.com/2017/09/19/books/review-nomadland-jessica-bruder.html

                              “Nomadland,” by Jessica Bruder, an important if frustrating new work influenced by such classics of immersion journalism as Barbara Ehrenreich’s “Nickel and Dimed,” looks at one strategy older workers have devised for “surviving America.”


                              Tens of thousands have traded in their homes for “wheel estate.” They are “the Okies of the Great Recession”: grandparents living in school buses and vans seeking seasonal work cleaning toilets at campgrounds, picking blueberries in Kentucky, sometimes for wages, sometimes for just a parking spot — “not necessarily paved but hopefully level.”


                               

                               

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                              • #60
                                All this talk about public defecation reminds me of a blog from a few years ago called "Spot the Mainlander"  Someone in Hong Kong would post pictures of people defecating in the streets.  I guess it is very common on the mainland especially with children.  You'll have to do you own Google image search.

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