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  • I’ve seen photoshop renderings of a painted CT. One in white made it look very futuristic in a good way and not futuristic in a dystopian future.

    the rivian does look nice but it’s for a different population. It’ll be like the Porsche taycan of the truck world.

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    • I honestly don’t think that was the real “Cyber Truck”, but was rather a sort of practical joke or publicity stunt by Musk, that has now morphed into an “emperor’s new clothes” situation.

      I guess only time will tell.

      In the meantime, “What a lovely truck that is.”

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      • If you go from one to 2 EV's do you need 2 separate 220 V outlets or can you split an existing 220 outlet?

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        • Separate 220V if you want to charge effectively. the V isn't the issue so much the Amps in the splitting -- just charges that much slower with lower Amps. Also have to look at the master bus if you have large enough --- older homes have 200A bus, which is a challenge in today's house needs.

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          • Originally posted by burritos View Post
            If you go from one to 2 EV's do you need 2 separate 220 V outlets or can you split an existing 220 outlet?
            To charge simultaneously and effectively one needs two 220V with a minimum of 32 amps for the base Model 3 and 48 amp for the Long range Model 3. Even the standard 14-50 outlets in the housed that is used for dryers etc give out only 80% of their rated 50 amp capacity = 40 amps.

            The older Tesla wall connectors are rated to put out 80 amps but need a 90-100 amp fuse and dedicated 4 gauge wires from the board to it. I have called my patient, who is an electrician to do it without being too costly, and the only way to do it is to mount it close to the junction box to reduce complexity. Luckily it is close to where I would have plugged in the connector anyway.

            BYW, the charger is actually built in the car. All the connector does is relay the current to the car to do its trick.

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            • Originally posted by StarTrekDoc View Post
              Separate 220V if you want to charge effectively. the V isn't the issue so much the Amps in the splitting -- just charges that much slower with lower Amps. Also have to look at the master bus if you have large enough --- older homes have 200A bus, which is a challenge in today's house needs.
              We have a 225 A bus. The electrician installed a subpanel when we put in the 220V for our leaf. If we get a 2nd EV, they both will be both within reach of the original plug. Commutes are 20 and 50 mi roundtrip. We could just alternate plug in or I could lvl 1 charge the shorter commute. Would getting a 2nd 220V really make sense?

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              • I'd just Level 1 charge the 20mi car - that's plenty for overnight charging. If you really were interested, you can charge three hours in the evening for the 20mi and then 50mi overnight. I'm sure you can find a toggle A/B switch for a 220V if you're determined to do this.

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                • How much does it cost to have an electrician run the lines needed to add another? It seems rather inconvenient otherwise. Once you switch to 2 EVs you likely will have 2 EVs forever.

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                  • Originally posted by burritos View Post

                    We have a 225 A bus. The electrician installed a subpanel when we put in the 220V for our leaf. If we get a 2nd EV, they both will be both within reach of the original plug. Commutes are 20 and 50 mi roundtrip. We could just alternate plug in or I could lvl 1 charge the shorter commute. Would getting a 2nd 220V really make sense?
                    For the few days that I used a 110V standard receptacle my Tesla charged at 3-5 miles per hour. When I switched to 220V 50 amp charging, it rose to 30 miles per hour it was plugged in.

                    Depends on what your second EV will be. And if you will be continuing to keep the original Leaf. Cheapest is keep the 220V for the new EV and use a 110V for the Leaf. If you want to add another 220V 14-50 outlet the cost of another breaker, receptacle and wires is $50-100. The electrician might charge another $100-200 to install the breaker and run the wires out of the breaker box to the wall, cut the sheet rock and install the receptacle.

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                    • Originally posted by burritos View Post

                      We have a 225 A bus. The electrician installed a subpanel when we put in the 220V for our leaf. If we get a 2nd EV, they both will be both within reach of the original plug. Commutes are 20 and 50 mi roundtrip. We could just alternate plug in or I could lvl 1 charge the shorter commute. Would getting a 2nd 220V really make sense?
                      There is also no reason for those commutes to need to charge everyday. The worst Leaf model will go 80 miles on a charge. You could do the 20 mile round trip 3x comfortably between charges. I'm guessing EV #2 is a Tesla of some sort, but even if not, I don't think there is a mainstream EV that cannot go 200 miles. That is also charging q3d for the 50 mile commute.

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                      • Point of reference - we had two evs at once: Fiat 500e and Chevy Spark - 90 and 80 mile effective ranges each. Over three years, we managed to put 36,000 and 30,000 on them with just one 220V and the 110V for level 2 and level 1 charging respectively -- it does take coordination on heavier travel days, but it's doable.

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                        • Thanks for the responses. Initially, I was dead set on getting a second line, but now I think it's unnecessary. Plus I can trickle charge at work.(My wife could too, but she doesn't want to do it).

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                          • We put a 100 amp sub-panel in our garage, with 2 x 50 amp circuits for 2 EV chargers. That way we just plug in when we arrive home and we don’t have to think about it. The onboard computers in the vehicles are set to automatically charge after midnight. Our local utility pays us around $50 to $100 per month to charge at night (more in the summer), even though we are charging with our grid connected solar power.

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                            • So nice to have a EV friendly power company! Here in SD, it's a mixed bag. Sempra runs ours, so bottom line is $$$. That said, our 12mn-6am TOU is 0.09 per Kwh - dirt cheap; but have to PAY $16/month for that rate. breaks even with relative low usage (250kwh)

                              Will be interesting when we get the Model Y. Will we want to place another 220V vs charge everyother day --haven't decided on that.

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                              • Originally posted by StarTrekDoc View Post
                                So nice to have a EV friendly power company! Here in SD, it's a mixed bag. Sempra runs ours, so bottom line is $$$. That said, our 12mn-6am TOU is 0.09 per Kwh - dirt cheap; but have to PAY $16/month for that rate. breaks even with relative low usage (250kwh)

                                Will be interesting when we get the Model Y. Will we want to place another 220V vs charge everyother day --haven't decided on that.
                                I can just use nissan's lvl 2 j1772 on tesla's right? Also, if we put the order for a long range y, what would guessitimate the eta would be?

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