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No fault accident causing car to be totalled, no collision coverage

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  • legobikes
    replied
    I ended up taking the 5k that I was given by insurance and buying the 2002 Lexus version of the Land Cruiser from some rich Korean folks in the Bay Area. They were a bit strange, the lady kept on referring to her husband and the person whose car it actually was as 'the boys' - "boys" who were at least a decade and a half older than me.

    Ad said 8k, she started at 7400, ended up selling for 6700. Good thing I went with a friend, having someone else on my side gave me some haggling confidence. Also I think they were tired of showing it to whatever Cruiser-enthusiast types had come before me. Had it checked by a mechanic the same day. Single owner vehicle with middling maintenance. These things aren't the cheapest to upkeep but I did just buy one of the most reliable transport machines on the market for about a tenth of its original price.

    ...So I guess that's what happens when you want the practicality of a Honda Element but can't stand how noisy it is. You buy an aged luxury machine that gets 15 mpg on a good day.

     

    Oh also, this car is pretty dirty on the inside and I wouldn't have bought it if I didn't know what a local detailer can do with gross cars.

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  • legobikes
    replied
    Yeah my trouble is having to drive too far (defined as >1 hour) to be able to look at private sellers' cars. I can't stand the idea of buying from a dealer.

     

    I had a lot of trouble finding our Highlander, but when I did it was clean, only 4 years old, and a good deal. So I'm still looking for a similar single-owner-with-regular-maintenance-records car.

     

    And I agree about the old CRVs too, the new ones are so ugly with their rounded butts - like a dog squatting to poop.

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  • redsand
    replied




    I don’t want apple and android whatever, in fact I’d pay extra not to have any infotainment/nav crap in the car, and I’d pay even more to have the old school AC controls where there’s a simple slider/knob that lets you decide how much cold/hot air is mixed, instead of individual passenger ‘climate control’.

    Turns out I don’t have to pay more not to have those UI holocausts, I can just pay less.

    But yes, I could get a Camry. I just feel like if it’s not as quiet as a Lexus then I’ll still be annoyed by the noise on the highway. Of course a Camry is relatively quiet and will likely have better mpg and power, but it’s too much of a compromise in the big ways.

     

    Edit: It sounds like I’m pretty set on the Element, but none of my argumentation is any guarantee I’ll be satisfied with it. However I still think it’s the best option. $5000 machine that provides for all my daily driver needs. I’m already excited about taking out one of the rear seats and installing a tiny bookshelf and throwing down a futon in the back.
    Click to expand...


    I have a similar perspective on my car and what I would do if I had to replace it: If I had to buy another car...I want a 2nd generation Honda CR-V (particularly 2005/2006 when they added side curtain airbags), because it looks better than the new ones and I like the rear visibility compared to all of the crossovers. I wouldn't have to worry about getting dents because it would be old...that would be nice. But while my car (2002 Civic) still runs, it's not a good financial deal to buy an older car unless I know the history of it, and I can't bring myself to take a chance on an old used car at a dealer, because I know where my car has been since I bought it CPO in 2005, and it has held up relatively well.

    Like another poster, I was looking for another car--just don't need one immediately. After looking at many, many used cars on dealer lots (not many private sales here), and seeing how dirty people have kept their interiors and/or the interiors have strong odors, I anticipate that I will end up buying a new car when I get another car because I'll get tired of looking at the used cars and not finding what I want.

    Leave a comment:


  • legobikes
    replied
    There's a lot of foam and dynamat that comes with that badge!

    Leave a comment:


  • Hank
    replied
    You do realize you that a Lexus ES is a Camry with a Lexus badge, right?

    Leave a comment:


  • legobikes
    replied
    I don't want apple and android whatever, in fact I'd pay extra not to have any infotainment/nav crap in the car, and I'd pay even more to have the old school AC controls where there's a simple slider/knob that lets you decide how much cold/hot air is mixed, instead of individual passenger 'climate control'.

    Turns out I don't have to pay more not to have those UI holocausts, I can just pay less.

    But yes, I could get a Camry. I just feel like if it's not as quiet as a Lexus then I'll still be annoyed by the noise on the highway. Of course a Camry is relatively quiet and will likely have better mpg and power, but it's too much of a compromise in the big ways.

     

    Edit: It sounds like I'm pretty set on the Element, but none of my argumentation is any guarantee I'll be satisfied with it. However I still think it's the best option. $5000 machine that provides for all my daily driver needs. I'm already excited about taking out one of the rear seats and installing a tiny bookshelf and throwing down a futon in the back.

    Leave a comment:


  • Hank
    replied
    You could get a Camry that’s new enough to have Apple CarPlay and Android Auto, then drive it for 10+ years.

    Leave a comment:


  • legobikes
    replied
    Because I don't want to spend more than 10k, and IF I get a sedan I want it to be a quiet car - so an Avalon or a Lexus ES/GS. There's not much else in that price range that's real quiet.

    Accords are not quiet.

    On the other hand, if I'm settling for a non-quiet car, I might as well get an Element, because it fits with my other criteria.

     

    I actually went and test-drove a Sienna because theoretically it would have checked all my boxes (Japanese, tall cargo space, quiet) since I read the 2015+ Sienna has made huge improvements in NVH, but it was decidedly not-quiet on the highway with massive wind noise, and I don't really like the idea of lugging around such a big and heavy box. Whereas the Element has a short length and a tight turning radius.

    Leave a comment:


  • Peds
    replied
    weird choices.

    why does it need to be a 8-10-16 year old car?

    why not another accord, even 5 years old?

     

    why not a used leaf if you are driving so little?

     

    to sumarize....basically youll have to decide....

    Leave a comment:


  • legobikes
    replied
    Update: Insurance agrees to pay me ~$5100 for the Accord. Pretty reasonable for the condition it was in.

    Now I'm stuck in car choice because I have strange criteria.

     

    I can either get a 2009-2011 Lexus ES350 or the Toyota-equivalent Avalon, as my quiet sedan. Never had a quiet car before and it was one of my foremost criteria when I imagined my Accord dying after a few years.

    OR I could get another beater in the form of a 2003-2006 Honda Element with very high miles, for no more than the money that I am getting from insurance. These things are reliable and I am drawn to their practicality and the cavernous cargo space. You can throw a futon in the back and use it as a mobile library (my intention, especially when the rain starts). I just hate that it's a very loud car, especially on the highway. Given that my commute is a mile on city streets, and my normal jaunts around town or to go hiking also require little to no highway use, perhaps it's worth it. Whenever we go on family trips we use the highlander hybrid, which is relatively quiet.

    Leave a comment:


  • Tim
    replied
    Keep in mind the value of the “beater” if that is all that is involved. Depending on the mileage, it’s a matter of “settling”. Neither your insurance company nor their insurance company will hire attorneys to “litigate” this and neither will you. Turn it in:
    You get legal support.
    You get paid from your insurance. No fault payment.
    Your insurance vs them negotiate.
    They settle or arbitrate.
    The arbitration settles it. (you are out of the process).
    If your insurance loses, your record is a “paid accident claim”.
    If your insurance shares claims history, your record will follow you.

    •The question is, will you get a better deal from their insurance or yours. Keep in mind, your insurance is a business relationship, not a fiduciary.
    •Your Insurance is easier , not necessarily better results.

    Leave a comment:


  • adventure
    replied


    You can always turn it into your insurance and have your insurance figure all of that out (that’s what you pay them to do). Your insurance may pay for a rental for you and then go after the other company for reimbursement.
    Click to expand...


    Yeah, this. Every time. Don't bother calling their insurance, that's why you have insurance (and why they have lawyers).

    Leave a comment:


  • ajm184
    replied
    I agree with others, get yourself checked out physically.  My wife got rear-ended at low speed while in Medical school.  She didn't believe she had any injury at the time, though since shortly afterward's her neck hurt and she continue's to self-PT to address the issue from her accident 15+ years later (has some foam triangle shaped pillow she uses).  If you have something documented, then you have the opportunity to make a decision for medical versus being locked out once you cash the check.

     

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  • benign_user
    replied




    The adjustor had asked about the carseat and I told her I thought it was fine, and then she called me up again yesterday at 4 pm ‘you need to release the car to us’. Alright, but why the snotty tone? I can do that. By the way, it seems like the carseat should be replaced–“no, only if it has some kind of damage.” Well alright, but I looked up NHTSA guidelines and there are specific criteria and one of them is if you can drive away from the acc-“I KNOW the criteria, you need to have a receipt or take a photo of the carseat in the vehicle.”

    …So why did you claim that I don’t need to replace it? I didn’t say that part, but will use it later if I need to. If they’re this reactive about a carseat, almost makes me want to file for injury as well. My neck is sore, my knee was hit in some spot medial to my patella and still hurts, and I’ve been irritable these past two days, almost certainly from whatever jostling my brain went through. I remember I had the same irritability after getting rear-ended by some lady on her phone in SoCal.

    The towing company person tried to tell me that I shouldn’t release the car to the insurance, because they will take the car and then ‘drag their feet’ and lowball me. I thought about that too, and it’s not like they can’t do both of those things even if you have the car sitting in your lot making you money. Didn’t say that part either, just said, I’m just going to risk it.

     

    (To be clear I’m not intending to claim any injuries.)
    Click to expand...


    Time to lawyer-up

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  • legobikes
    replied
    Yeah but I hate doctors.

    Leave a comment:

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