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  • barelybarefoot
    replied
    I’m not gullible (I don’t think), I’m not stupid either, but i’m human. I think the issue is that I originally tuned into WCI and POF for the message MDs make lots of money and if you stick with some simple savings, work hard, invest wisely, you’ll be on the path to financial independence. It doesn’t matter that they two of you don’t do this, but I (my fault to guess) trust or site and it’s like the pharmaceutical companies giving free samples, yes I can resist it, but if I see it over and over maybe it will influence my choices. I avoid PIMD site for this reason, I don’t want need the carrot, but now it’s all over WCI and even PoF. Also, they are touted as 2 MD and able to do all this real estate magic, but she no longer is an MD and I believe he is 50%. It should be ‘part-time MD and career real estate professional’ who have. As successful real estate empire. So very misleading. Again, hard to ‘take what you want’ ignore the rest when it’s so in your face now.

    Leave a comment:


  • The White Coat Investor
    replied
    Originally posted by Panscan View Post

    It's not a disservice but if you can't see your own posts are becoming like qvc ads then im not sure what to tell you. I read one where you were saying " hurry we have more spots for the conference but they're going fast." idk it just seems weird to me.

    I also think the objectivity of guest posts is getting worse. They just seem to be getting more and more like sales pitches.
    Now you don't even want me to sell my own products? I'm not sure what you think WCI is, so let me be clear. It is a FOR-PROFIT business written by a CAPITALIST who is trying to DO WELL WHILE DOING GOOD.

    At any rate, I appreciate the feedback but I'm probably going to mostly disregard feedback from folks who want me to work for free because I'm not willing to do that (and I assure you I am doing lots of work.)

    By the way, the conference currently has 7 spots left: https://whitecoatinvestor.regfox.com/pwflc20

    As far as the guest posts, we have a higher percentage than ever being written by regular readers rather than financial firms so I wonder if your sensitivity to sales pitches has simply gone up rather than your actual exposure to them. I think well over half of them for the first quarter of 2020 are written by physician readers like today's post on scholarships written by a med student. Now if you had said a higher percentage of my writing includes promotional material, I'd buy it. But I wouldn't apologize for it.

    I'm creating two new high income professional jobs in the next 6 months, guess where the money for those salaries is going to come from?

    Leave a comment:


  • Panscan
    replied
    Originally posted by The White Coat Investor View Post

    Not sure the guest post has anything to do with it. I got similar feedback on my blog post that I published today about a passive real estate deal. There is a certain percentage of people who feel a financial blogger is doing a disservice to their audience to do anything but recommend they buy Vanguard index funds in every post, but Vanguard keeps refusing to sponsor my blog and I only know how to say "invest in index funds" in so many different ways (a number certainly far less than the 1800 posts on this blog.) It's just not a recipe for a long-lived blog to write only about index funds and take sponsorship only from Vanguard.

    But you're right, the lines get blurry especially when the marketing and journalism departments are both contained in the same mind. The problem these day is that companies have caught on to the fact that you guys ignore banner ads and only read the content. I had a 20 minute call this morning with a real estate syndicator who basically just wanted to come on the podcast and "educate" you guys as to the merits of real estate syndications. But if that's all the podcasts were, there would be no audience to listen to them. Tough balance sometimes.
    It's not a disservice but if you can't see your own posts are becoming like qvc ads then im not sure what to tell you. I read one where you were saying " hurry we have more spots for the conference but they're going fast." idk it just seems weird to me.

    I also think the objectivity of guest posts is getting worse. They just seem to be getting more and more like sales pitches.

    Leave a comment:


  • G
    commented on 's reply
    Jim, you know I loved that post. I just gotta find a way to bring it up every year or so.

  • The White Coat Investor
    commented on 's reply
    Gotta love the loyal opposition.

  • mkintx
    commented on 's reply
    Bwah ha ha!!!!!!

  • G
    replied
    Originally posted by The White Coat Investor View Post

    Not sure the guest post has anything to do with it. I got similar feedback on my blog post that I published today about a passive real estate deal. There is a certain percentage of people who feel a financial blogger is doing a disservice to their audience to do anything but recommend they buy Vanguard index funds in every post, but Vanguard keeps refusing to sponsor my blog and I only know how to say "invest in index funds" in so many different ways (a number certainly far less than the 1800 posts on this blog.) It's just not a recipe for a long-lived blog to write only about index funds and take sponsorship only from Vanguard.

    But you're right, the lines get blurry especially when the marketing and journalism departments are both contained in the same mind. The problem these day is that companies have caught on to the fact that you guys ignore banner ads and only read the content. I had a 20 minute call this morning with a real estate syndicator who basically just wanted to come on the podcast and "educate" you guys as to the merits of real estate syndications. But if that's all the podcasts were, there would be no audience to listen to them. Tough balance sometimes.
    Let me be clear: It is time for another colored diamond post.

    Leave a comment:


  • The White Coat Investor
    replied
    Originally posted by jacoavlu View Post
    expect pushback when there’s blurring of lines between the journalism and marketing departments

    most will interpret a “guest post” as an endorsement of the product and message, disclaimers or not
    Not sure the guest post has anything to do with it. I got similar feedback on my blog post that I published today about a passive real estate deal. There is a certain percentage of people who feel a financial blogger is doing a disservice to their audience to do anything but recommend they buy Vanguard index funds in every post, but Vanguard keeps refusing to sponsor my blog and I only know how to say "invest in index funds" in so many different ways (a number certainly far less than the 1800 posts on this blog.) It's just not a recipe for a long-lived blog to write only about index funds and take sponsorship only from Vanguard.

    But you're right, the lines get blurry especially when the marketing and journalism departments are both contained in the same mind. The problem these day is that companies have caught on to the fact that you guys ignore banner ads and only read the content. I had a 20 minute call this morning with a real estate syndicator who basically just wanted to come on the podcast and "educate" you guys as to the merits of real estate syndications. But if that's all the podcasts were, there would be no audience to listen to them. Tough balance sometimes.

    Leave a comment:


  • jacoavlu
    replied
    expect pushback when there’s blurring of lines between the journalism and marketing departments

    most will interpret a “guest post” as an endorsement of the product and message, disclaimers or not

    Leave a comment:


  • mkintx
    replied
    Originally posted by The White Coat Investor View Post

    Typical affiliate commissions on online courses are 20-50%. You can do the math. But after you do it, ask yourself why all of the bloggers you follow are running for-profit businesses. The answer is that those who aren't don't blog long enough for you to find them. It turns out it is a lot of work to generate quality content and build an audience and bloggers, like the rest of us, will only work for free for so long.
    They are also putting their reputation behind this product when they promote it this way. If I signed up and felt duped, I would blame the blogger who referred me to it, in addition to the creators of the product. A trustworthy reputation is an asset a successful blogger wouldn't, presumably, risk on a shoddy product. There's a little more to it than the fact that bloggers want to make a profit.

    Leave a comment:


  • formerly_cn
    replied
    The White Coat Investor

    Agreed. Selling is hard. I can sort of see from sellers perspective, I think what Kenji (sp?) is doing is hitting the ground running on this "cold" audience (many docs here not really into RE). So he's going hard right away. Gotta warm up the audience first before the hard sell. As you say, soft sell kinda rubbed it the wrong way.

    I think folks are also pointing out how difficult it actually is. It is a business, and so you can expect set backs (deal fell through, competition etc). So its just not walk in the park to leverage up and be FI in 5 years. It depends on skills, luck, economic factors etc. Things that just kinda got bypassed for demo purposes (which I understand) but makes it seem more selling than something based on reality.

    Leave a comment:


  • The White Coat Investor
    replied
    Originally posted by formerly_cn View Post
    Quite the discussion.

    I'll post my thoughts about this soon but overall I think it's the manner of presentation by the course sellers. They seem trying hard to sell it and it's rubbing their customers (us docs) the wrong way.
    It's surprisingly difficult to get "the soft sell" right. Of course they want to sell as many courses as they can. It's a for-profit business. But at the end of the day, you know the conflicts of interest, you have the information you need to make an informed decision, and there's a 100% money back guarantee. Think of all the stuff you buy where you don't have all three of those things, maybe not even one of them.

    Leave a comment:


  • The White Coat Investor
    replied
    Originally posted by mkintx View Post
    I thought it was interesting that almost every physician blogger I follow was promoting this course and giving away bonuses with their affiliate links. How much of that $2100 went to these affiliates?
    Typical affiliate commissions on online courses are 20-50%. You can do the math. But after you do it, ask yourself why all of the bloggers you follow are running for-profit businesses. The answer is that those who aren't don't blog long enough for you to find them. It turns out it is a lot of work to generate quality content and build an audience and bloggers, like the rest of us, will only work for free for so long.

    Leave a comment:


  • dennis
    replied
    As a retired physician living off real estate income I have real estate professional status. I was not able to get it as a working doc because of the time and income % needed to qualify as professional and my wife wasn't interested in it. Most real estate investors will tell you it is not get rich quick investing but you can get quite wealthy doing it and the tax advantages are huge, especially if you are REPS. We are using cost segregation last year and this year to advantage, for instance we took a $150K IRA distribution in Sept. to purchase a 12 plex and will pay no tax on the distribution because of the cost segregation depreciation write off. This allows us to get $ out of the IRA and not be hit with RMDs in a few years and will generate income outside of the IRA. Real estate is not a "take one course and get rich" scheme and I doubt the course sellers are saying that.

    Leave a comment:


  • Lordosis
    replied
    Originally posted by mkintx View Post
    I thought it was interesting that almost every physician blogger I follow was promoting this course and giving away bonuses with their affiliate links. How much of that $2100 went to these affiliates?

    I actually looked into the course quite a bit, and asked people who had done it before about their experiences. They really did have very good experiences, learned a lot, and got started in something they had been considering for a while. Almost all had a stay at home spouse or part time spouse to get the real estate professional status. My spouse wasn't interested and found the sales pitch to be over the top, so we didn't bite. I know a lot of people did, and I'll probably ask them about it again in a few months.
    You forgot your affiliate link :P

    Leave a comment:

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