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  • Pursuing first physician job out of residency

    Hello all,

    My wife is soon starting her final year of Family Med residency, and thus the start of interviewing for her first "real" job. She more-or-less has a guaranteed job within the system her residency is in, but I'm encouraging her to at least shop around for other systems that might have better pay, better hours, more opportunities for growth, etc. At least give her something to measure her current system's offer.

    There's a listing for a family med physician that has the opportunity to teach med students and a brand new residency program that she's interested in getting more info about. What's the procedure here? Work through a recruiter? Just hit the "Apply" button on the listing and hope for the best? Reach out to the program director or somebody else? Something else I'm not thinking of?

    Thanks!

    ~Kevin

     

  • #2
    Contact the hospitals directly. There will almost certainly be an in house recruiter in most of these situations. You can send her information through the ‘apply’ button and they will likely get in contact with her in a few days.

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    • #3
      I agree with contacting the hospital directly. Try to avoid any hired recruiters (this doesn't include in-house recruiters as most largish hospital systems will have their own). She should absolutely see what other offers are out there. No harm in that.

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      • #4
        You'd be pretty darn surprised how far you can get sending a polite email to the recruiter. I did this for my hometown group (somewhat known for their zero turnover since forming) and somehow got a spot there. Lay out all the background and why she is interested in a place. Good luck!

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        • #5
          Even if she has her heart set on a place, tell her to go on interviews. If nothing else, she may get an offer that she can utilize to negotiate.

          No matter where she gets offered and even if its more than you both imagined, negotiate something. You never know what they're leaving on the table.

          For radiology, I used personal contacts. There is also a job board for radiology. I managed getting interviews through both and the job through the ACR job site.

          Make sure her CV is up to date. Have a good cover letter ready to email (I had a standard couple paragraphs and usually edited the last bit depending on where I was applying).

           

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          • #6
            Update CV.  Make sure basic phone interviewing etiquette is maintained.  I would absolutely take a more active role in this process, first determining what kind of job she wants and then targeting locations of interest.  Then take a pro-active approach and reach out to recruiters, practice administrators, etc. at the given practices.  Have a planned script/email prepared and even a cover letter for jobs that might be more competitive.  Interview around.  Have questions prepared and do research on places before even reaching out the first time.

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            • #7
              Thanks everyone for the positive and useful feedback. I will convey this to her - we'll definitely reach out to the system in hopes of getting more info and potentially setting up an interview. I am also a proponent of being proactive when it comes to job hunting, but that comes from someone who's been in the software industry for a decade. Nice to know we can take a similar approach to physician roles.

               

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              • #8
                Very rarely will “great jobs” find new attendings”. For whatever reason (money) an additional 1/2 physician seems to get covered by existing staff. General discussions lead to potential additions and she may get a call 3 months later. The timing of the need of the hospital or group is the key. Don’t hold your breath on details of the offer until after an interview and details are discussed, with the intent of extending.

                The problem is, the timing of multiple offers. Be prepared to communicate a job search timeline for making a decision. 9 months lead time for credentialing if out of state is reasonable. She may end up turning down a position that she later wants due to indecision.
                Thumbnail expectations of compensation are available on MGMA and AMGA surveys. Good luck.

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                • #9




                  Very rarely will “great jobs” find new attendings”. For whatever reason (money) an additional 1/2 physician seems to get covered by existing staff. General discussions lead to potential additions and she may get a call 3 months later. The timing of the need of the hospital or group is the key. Don’t hold your breath on details of the offer until after an interview and details are discussed, with the intent of extending.

                  The problem is, the timing of multiple offers. Be prepared to communicate a job search timeline for making a decision. 9 months lead time for credentialing if out of state is reasonable. She may end up turning down a position that she later wants due to indecision.
                  Thumbnail expectations of compensation are available on MGMA and AMGA surveys. Good luck.
                  Click to expand...


                  Thanks for the input. Since she's still got a year of residency left, this is just a high level discussion. Plenty of time to credential out-of-state.

                  She is interested in doing something in addition to seeing patients, such as academia, leadership, or research. To find a position with options for one or many of these opportunities requires some investigation and discussion with systems on expectations.

                  Will pursue MGMA and AMGA. Thanks.

                  Comment


                  • #10


                    such as academia, leadership, or research.
                    Click to expand...


                    She definately needs to seek some mentoring within her program. I know absolutely zero about FM. I would think the types of employment she desires may require a fellowship. Do not underestimate the lead times. For employment she needs to be interviewing late fall to early spring.

                    https://nf.aafp.org/Directories/Fellowship/Search

                    Good luck!

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                    • #11
                      Congrats on joining the doctor's wives club.

                      Yeah send out them CVs far and wide.  I would aim for the department heads, CEOs, etc and less for trying to find in-house recruiters or simply submitting an online application.

                      Also good to be friends with and talk to resident/fellow classmates in the years above who are already out there.  The intel you can get from communication is tremendous.  Details on jobs and contracts, introductions to the decisionmakers are what you want.

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                      • #12
                        Having gone through this in family practice myself just a few years ago be wary of high starting salaries and make sure that she will be able to maintain hr salary after a few years.  The job I took had one of the lower starting salaries but due to the way my productivity is calculated I have tremendous potential for growth.  I happened to have a fried who worked at the place offering the highest starting salary and signing bonus but after 2 years his pay dropped significantly because he could not ramp up production enough.

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                        • #13




                          Having gone through this in family practice myself just a few years ago be wary of high starting salaries and make sure that she will be able to maintain hr salary after a few years.  The job I took had one of the lower starting salaries but due to the way my productivity is calculated I have tremendous potential for growth.  I happened to have a fried who worked at the place offering the highest starting salary and signing bonus but after 2 years his pay dropped significantly because he could not ramp up production enough.
                          Click to expand...


                          This is of course a great point and something we are wary of. Right now her "home" system is totally salary based, which is appealing. May be a lower salary than what she could be making, but it is guaranteed. In truth, I care much more about her being happy, fulfilled with her work, and minimal amounts of stress rather than making a little more money. So we're looking for the best fit, not necessarily the flashiest income.

                           




                          Congrats on joining the doctor’s wives club.

                          Yeah send out them CVs far and wide.  I would aim for the department heads, CEOs, etc and less for trying to find in-house recruiters or simply submitting an online application.

                          Also good to be friends with and talk to resident/fellow classmates in the years above who are already out there.  The intel you can get from communication is tremendous.  Details on jobs and contracts, introductions to the decisionmakers are what you want.
                          Click to expand...


                          She is definitely plugged into past classes and seniors now graduating. We have a good feel for what is out there in terms of salary, especially in our area. However we're also looking to potentially move to a different state, which means we have less connection with those working there.

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                          • #14







                            Having gone through this in family practice myself just a few years ago be wary of high starting salaries and make sure that she will be able to maintain hr salary after a few years.  The job I took had one of the lower starting salaries but due to the way my productivity is calculated I have tremendous potential for growth.  I happened to have a fried who worked at the place offering the highest starting salary and signing bonus but after 2 years his pay dropped significantly because he could not ramp up production enough.
                            Click to expand…


                            This is of course a great point and something we are wary of. Right now her “home” system is totally salary based, which is appealing. May be a lower salary than what she could be making, but it is guaranteed. In truth, I care much more about her being happy, fulfilled with her work, and minimal amounts of stress rather than making a little more money. So we’re looking for the best fit, not necessarily the flashiest income.

                             

                             
                            Click to expand...


                            I could not agree with that more.  Happiness is key.  It is better to get paid less and work 10 more years then to burn out early.  Just be careful. The strictly salary based jobs have the ability to over work you too and you do not eve get paid for it.   This has made me a fan of the "earn what you kill" type of mindset because at least when I am swamped I know I am going to be fairly compensated for it.

                            If the people at her home system are happy then that is a good sign.  I am sure there are some people she knows that can give honest opinions.

                            Best of luck!

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