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Necessary to find a handyman who is insured?

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  • Necessary to find a handyman who is insured?

    If I have homeowners liability insurance and an umbrella policy do I still need to use a handyman who is insured? Thanks in advance.

  • #2
    These policies probably don't cover injury to workers you employ to work on your property. I couldn't find policies that covered these issues (thought I admit I didn't look that hard).
    Erstwhile Dance Theatre of Dayton performer cum bellhop. Carried (many) bags for a lovely and gracious 59 yo Cyd Charisse. (RIP) Hosted epic company parties after Friday night rehearsals.

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    • #3
      That is good to know. I may double check with Geico. Makes sense. Thanks!

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      • #4
        Check your state workmen’s comp regs. If s/he is injured on the job and is not covered under your policy, you could be in for a whole lot of hurt.
        Any of you who hire contractors, handymen, whatever, should ask to see a copy of their coverage.
        Working to protect good doctors from bad advisors. Fox & Co CPAs, Fox & Co Wealth Mgmt. 270-247-6087

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        • #5
          ha, I always wondered about this. it is literally against the law to not have worker's comp in my state...not that your buddy of a buddy giving you a hand for a couple bucks would be that rigorous. one would think this is exactly what an umbrella is for, but I get it....

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          • #6
            Originally posted by G View Post
            ha, I always wondered about this. it is literally against the law to not have worker's comp in my state...not that your buddy of a buddy giving you a hand for a couple bucks would be that rigorous. one would think this is exactly what an umbrella is for, but I get it....
            I ran into the “buddy” type issue. Trimming some palm trees. The thought of a chain saw climbing at 40 feet made me consider permanent disability. That “guilt trip” regardless of how rigorous he would be prompted me to hire a contractor with insurance.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by jfoxcpacfp View Post
              Check your state workmen’s comp regs. If s/he is injured on the job and is not covered under your policy, you could be in for a whole lot of hurt.
              Any of you who hire contractors, handymen, whatever, should ask to see a copy of their coverage.
              What exactly should they have that I would want to confirm? Just that they have health insurance?

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              • #8
                Originally posted by Timparsons952 View Post

                What exactly should they have that I would want to confirm? Just that they have health insurance?
                Workmen's comp and general liability policies. They should be able to give you copies of their certificates of insurance with expiration dates.
                Erstwhile Dance Theatre of Dayton performer cum bellhop. Carried (many) bags for a lovely and gracious 59 yo Cyd Charisse. (RIP) Hosted epic company parties after Friday night rehearsals.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by Timparsons952 View Post

                  What exactly should they have that I would want to confirm? Just that they have health insurance?
                  Found this with quick search (written for general contractors, but you are the GC when you hire subs to work on your property):

                  Step 3: Receive a Certificate of Insurance


                  Collecting a certificate of insurance, or COI, from your subcontractors is arguably equally as important as having them sign a contract. This is your “proof” that they have the insurance coverage you require in your contract. Just like the subcontractor contract, your carriers require you collect this COI and keep it on file. Proof is in quotations because, unfortunately, that piece of paper is just a piece of paper at the end of the day, so you should always follow up with the agency listed on the form to verify the insurance.

                  There are two main insurance policies you should always require your construction subs to ist on the certificate: General Liability and Workers Compensation.

                  Verify your Subcontractor has General Liability insurance
                  Should a claim arise from the work your sub is performing on the project, you’ll want to make sure they have the insurance to cover the damages. You don’t want a claim to hit your insurance for work you didn’t actually perform. The indemnity in the subcontractor agreement[c] holds you harmless for the work of the subcontractor; making sure they have the insurance to cover a claim is your peace of mind.

                  Also, make sure their general liability insurance lists you as an additional insured. If the claim does trickle up to you and a homeowner / property manager wants to file a claim on your insurance (since you are top dog on the project), being additional insured means that you can use the subcontractors insurance as coverage instead of your own, further protecting your company from claims. This works to keep your insurance premiums as low as possible by maintaining a clean loss history with your carriers.

                  Verify your Subcontractor has Workers Compensation insurance
                  This is similar to verifying your subcontractor carriers general liability because you’ll want to make sure that if the subcontractor is injured on the job, they have their own coverage to pay against those injuries, rather than coming after you. Think your workers comp carrier will deny the claim if a subcontractor without insurance tries to file a claim on your workers comp? He’s a sub, there’s no coverage right? Not so fast....

                  Workers Compensation policies will cover all individuals hired by your company, whether they are W-2, subcontractors without workers compensation coverage, or that guy you hired for the day. Collecting a certificate showing a comp policy before the sub starts work is your assurance that if something goes awry, they won’t need to look to you to pay the medical bills. Verifying the coverage first is much easier than trying to find insurance at renewal with a claim on your policy.

                  https://citizensgeneral.com/business...subcontractors
                  Erstwhile Dance Theatre of Dayton performer cum bellhop. Carried (many) bags for a lovely and gracious 59 yo Cyd Charisse. (RIP) Hosted epic company parties after Friday night rehearsals.

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